Modernities Compared: State Transformations and Constitutions of Property in the Qing and Ottoman Empires

Modernities Compared: State Transformations and Constitutions of Property in the Qing and Ottoman... MODERNITIES COMPARED: STATE TRANSFORMATIONS AND CONSTITUTIONS OF PROPERTY IN THE QING AND OTTOMAN EMPIRES HURI ISLAMOGLU Bo � aziçi University Modernity has long been the preserve of Europe. Social science per- spectives on modernization that have shaped the categories of histori- cal analysis since the nineteenth century have excluded the Ottoman and the Chinese empires from mappings of modernity.' Instead, the two empires are designated as part of an undifferentiated and ahistorical domain of the East, characterized by what it lacks: individual owner- ship of property, rational organization of market activity, and rational bureaucratic forms of government. This construct of the East provides a contrast to an equally abstract domain of the West (including west- ern Europe and its extensions in the United States) privileged with the presence of modern forms. This high drama of absences and presences of idealized properties has been instrumental in legitimating European domination of the East. The notion of oriental despotism has been a central feature of that legitimation.' In Asia it facilitated the setting up of colonial administrations that could be identified as rational and bureau- cratic, as opposed to the arbitrary rule of the despot and the constraints that such rule http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Early Modern History Brill

Modernities Compared: State Transformations and Constitutions of Property in the Qing and Ottoman Empires

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/modernities-compared-state-transformations-and-constitutions-of-4tTtJ57WAx
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1385-3783
eISSN
1570-0658
D.O.I.
10.1163/157006501X00159
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MODERNITIES COMPARED: STATE TRANSFORMATIONS AND CONSTITUTIONS OF PROPERTY IN THE QING AND OTTOMAN EMPIRES HURI ISLAMOGLU Bo � aziçi University Modernity has long been the preserve of Europe. Social science per- spectives on modernization that have shaped the categories of histori- cal analysis since the nineteenth century have excluded the Ottoman and the Chinese empires from mappings of modernity.' Instead, the two empires are designated as part of an undifferentiated and ahistorical domain of the East, characterized by what it lacks: individual owner- ship of property, rational organization of market activity, and rational bureaucratic forms of government. This construct of the East provides a contrast to an equally abstract domain of the West (including west- ern Europe and its extensions in the United States) privileged with the presence of modern forms. This high drama of absences and presences of idealized properties has been instrumental in legitimating European domination of the East. The notion of oriental despotism has been a central feature of that legitimation.' In Asia it facilitated the setting up of colonial administrations that could be identified as rational and bureau- cratic, as opposed to the arbitrary rule of the despot and the constraints that such rule

Journal

Journal of Early Modern HistoryBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off