Mixed Mandarin & Wú―Dialects of Jìngjiāng Island

Mixed Mandarin & Wú―Dialects of Jìngjiāng Island This paper presents a brief overview of the island and the dialect that is spoken in the southern village of Shíwěi and a comparison of the speech of two generations. We examine the difference in the speech of a father born in 1939 and his daughter born in 1961. The comparison is primarily focused on phonological and lexical features of the language of the two speakers. Following a detailed examination and analysis of over 500 words and features, in contrast to her father we find the daughter’s speech appears to slightly trend toward Mandarin and standard Chinese forms, while the father’s speech is more conservative, with a stronger local flavor and Wú dialect coloring. In overall perspective, however, the dialect of both speakers is strongly mixed and neither can be definitively classed as either Mandarin or Wú. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of Chinese Linguistics Brill

Mixed Mandarin & Wú―Dialects of Jìngjiāng Island

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/mixed-mandarin-w-dialects-of-j-ngji-ng-island-HQq4j57B28
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1933-6985
eISSN
2405-478X
D.O.I.
10.1163/2405478X-90000083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper presents a brief overview of the island and the dialect that is spoken in the southern village of Shíwěi and a comparison of the speech of two generations. We examine the difference in the speech of a father born in 1939 and his daughter born in 1961. The comparison is primarily focused on phonological and lexical features of the language of the two speakers. Following a detailed examination and analysis of over 500 words and features, in contrast to her father we find the daughter’s speech appears to slightly trend toward Mandarin and standard Chinese forms, while the father’s speech is more conservative, with a stronger local flavor and Wú dialect coloring. In overall perspective, however, the dialect of both speakers is strongly mixed and neither can be definitively classed as either Mandarin or Wú.

Journal

Bulletin of Chinese LinguisticsBrill

Published: Jan 24, 2011

Keywords: Chinese dialects; Wú dialects; Mandarin dialects; Jìngjiāng dialects; dialect classification

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off