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Minority Schools Financing in the Danish-German Border Region

Minority Schools Financing in the Danish-German Border Region Martin Klatt* I. Introduction The day after the Pentecost weekend of 2010, the Conservative-liberal (CDUFDP) coalition government of the German federal state (Land) SchleswigHolstein announced that it planned to cut funding of the private Danish-language minority schools from 100% to 85% of the statistical average per pupil operating costs of the state's public schools. This decision was one among several measures to stabilize the budget of debt-ridden Schleswig-Holstein. The same prime minister (Peter Harry Carstensen, CDU) had as head of a grand coalition government of the CDU and the social democrats (SPD) signed a school law for SchleswigHolstein characterizing the Danish minority schools, organizationally operated as private schools, to be the "minority's public schools" and assuring them state funding on an equal level with the state's public schools only three years earlier. The Danish minority and its political party, the South Schleswig Voters' Association (Südschleswigscher Wählerverband, SSW), had strived for this status for several decades and were consequently upset by the budget cuts, which they perceived as discriminatory. Regional minority expert Jørgen Kühl considered these events to be evidence for a crisis of a hitherto praised model of minority­majority reconciliation.¹ In this article, I will present the historic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Minority Schools Financing in the Danish-German Border Region

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 11 (1): 359 – Nov 17, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90110053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Martin Klatt* I. Introduction The day after the Pentecost weekend of 2010, the Conservative-liberal (CDUFDP) coalition government of the German federal state (Land) SchleswigHolstein announced that it planned to cut funding of the private Danish-language minority schools from 100% to 85% of the statistical average per pupil operating costs of the state's public schools. This decision was one among several measures to stabilize the budget of debt-ridden Schleswig-Holstein. The same prime minister (Peter Harry Carstensen, CDU) had as head of a grand coalition government of the CDU and the social democrats (SPD) signed a school law for SchleswigHolstein characterizing the Danish minority schools, organizationally operated as private schools, to be the "minority's public schools" and assuring them state funding on an equal level with the state's public schools only three years earlier. The Danish minority and its political party, the South Schleswig Voters' Association (Südschleswigscher Wählerverband, SSW), had strived for this status for several decades and were consequently upset by the budget cuts, which they perceived as discriminatory. Regional minority expert Jørgen Kühl considered these events to be evidence for a crisis of a hitherto praised model of minority­majority reconciliation.¹ In this article, I will present the historic

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Nov 17, 2014

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