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Minority and Indigenous Rights in UN Treaty Bodies Practice (2005–2009): Multicultural Challenges

Minority and Indigenous Rights in UN Treaty Bodies Practice (2005–2009): Multicultural Challenges Alexandra Xanthaki * Minority and Indigenous Rights in UN Treaty Bodies Practice (2005–2009): Multicultural Challenges Th e work of United Nations treaty bodies is useful to anyone interested in minor- ity and indigenous rights, because these bodies at times interpret, develop and push further the relevant standards of current international law. Debates within society are often reproduced in discussions of the states’ reports, because United Nations bodies aim to provide directions consistent with international law instruments. In view of this, the limited number of references to ‘multiculturalism’ in the work of UN treaty bodies seems odd. Th e justifi cation that the term is not included in any instrument of international human rights law seems irrelevant in an era when multiculturalism con- sumes so much of the public space. Even the vagueness of the concept does not justify its absence from United Nations deliberations. Indeed, discussions in the Committee against All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) revealed unease among members 1 2 with the concept and a disagreement on its scope. Recalling the discussion during that day, one can feel an insistence at times on the reality of multicultural societies, i.e., societies in which many cultures coexist, and a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Minority and Indigenous Rights in UN Treaty Bodies Practice (2005–2009): Multicultural Challenges

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90001653
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alexandra Xanthaki * Minority and Indigenous Rights in UN Treaty Bodies Practice (2005–2009): Multicultural Challenges Th e work of United Nations treaty bodies is useful to anyone interested in minor- ity and indigenous rights, because these bodies at times interpret, develop and push further the relevant standards of current international law. Debates within society are often reproduced in discussions of the states’ reports, because United Nations bodies aim to provide directions consistent with international law instruments. In view of this, the limited number of references to ‘multiculturalism’ in the work of UN treaty bodies seems odd. Th e justifi cation that the term is not included in any instrument of international human rights law seems irrelevant in an era when multiculturalism con- sumes so much of the public space. Even the vagueness of the concept does not justify its absence from United Nations deliberations. Indeed, discussions in the Committee against All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD) revealed unease among members 1 2 with the concept and a disagreement on its scope. Recalling the discussion during that day, one can feel an insistence at times on the reality of multicultural societies, i.e., societies in which many cultures coexist, and a

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Feb 9, 2010

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