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Message in a Bottle: A Gallery of Social/Political Cartoons from Burma

Message in a Bottle: A Gallery of Social/Political Cartoons from Burma <jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>In Burma or Myanmar where the ruling State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) seeks control over public discourse, social and political criticism must be carefully disguised. Cartoons, featured in privately published monthly magazines, play an important role in the circulation of critical discourse. Cartoons allow for multiple interpretations and thus can carry social messages through the strict censorship system. Eleven cartoons are presented, suggesting some current popular concerns. They satirize state propaganda and raise questions about the impact of new foreign investment. More generally, they reflect a worldview which sees norms of morality and rationality being steadily eroded under SLORC rule.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Journal of Social Science Brill

Message in a Bottle: A Gallery of Social/Political Cartoons from Burma

Asian Journal of Social Science , Volume 25 (1): 151 – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1568-4849
eISSN
1568-5314
DOI
10.1163/030382497X00095
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>In Burma or Myanmar where the ruling State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) seeks control over public discourse, social and political criticism must be carefully disguised. Cartoons, featured in privately published monthly magazines, play an important role in the circulation of critical discourse. Cartoons allow for multiple interpretations and thus can carry social messages through the strict censorship system. Eleven cartoons are presented, suggesting some current popular concerns. They satirize state propaganda and raise questions about the impact of new foreign investment. More generally, they reflect a worldview which sees norms of morality and rationality being steadily eroded under SLORC rule.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

Asian Journal of Social ScienceBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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