Meat Is Good to Taboo: Dietary Proscriptions as a Product of the Interaction of Psychological Mechanisms and Social Processes

Meat Is Good to Taboo: Dietary Proscriptions as a Product of the Interaction of Psychological... Meat Is Good to Taboo ¤ Dietary Proscriptions as a Product of the Interaction of Psychological Mechanisms and Social Processes D ANIEL M.T. F ESSLER ¤¤ and C ARLOS D AVID N AVARRETE ¤¤ ABSTRACT Comparing food taboos across 78 cultures, this paper demonstrates that meat, though a prized food, is also the principal target of proscriptions. Reviewing existing explanations of taboos, we Ž nd that both functionalist and symbolic approaches fail to account for meat’s cross-cultural centrality and do not re ect experience-near aspects of food taboos, principal among which is disgust. Adopting an evolutionary approach to the mind, this paper presents an alternative to existing explanations of food taboos. Consistent with the attendant risk of pathogen transmission, meat has special salience as a stimulus for humans, as animal products are stronger elicitors of disgust and aversion than plant products. We identify three psychosocial processes, socially-mediated ingestive conditioning, egocentric empathy , and normative moralization , each of which likely plays a role in transforming individual disgust responses and conditioned food aversions into institutionalized food taboos. Introduction Cultural understandings concerning food, edibility, contamination, and re- lated topics exhibit enormous variation across groups (Barer-Stein 1999; Rozin 2000; Simoons 1994). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognition and Culture Brill

Meat Is Good to Taboo: Dietary Proscriptions as a Product of the Interaction of Psychological Mechanisms and Social Processes

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2003 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1567-7095
eISSN
1568-5373
DOI
10.1163/156853703321598563
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Meat Is Good to Taboo ¤ Dietary Proscriptions as a Product of the Interaction of Psychological Mechanisms and Social Processes D ANIEL M.T. F ESSLER ¤¤ and C ARLOS D AVID N AVARRETE ¤¤ ABSTRACT Comparing food taboos across 78 cultures, this paper demonstrates that meat, though a prized food, is also the principal target of proscriptions. Reviewing existing explanations of taboos, we Ž nd that both functionalist and symbolic approaches fail to account for meat’s cross-cultural centrality and do not re ect experience-near aspects of food taboos, principal among which is disgust. Adopting an evolutionary approach to the mind, this paper presents an alternative to existing explanations of food taboos. Consistent with the attendant risk of pathogen transmission, meat has special salience as a stimulus for humans, as animal products are stronger elicitors of disgust and aversion than plant products. We identify three psychosocial processes, socially-mediated ingestive conditioning, egocentric empathy , and normative moralization , each of which likely plays a role in transforming individual disgust responses and conditioned food aversions into institutionalized food taboos. Introduction Cultural understandings concerning food, edibility, contamination, and re- lated topics exhibit enormous variation across groups (Barer-Stein 1999; Rozin 2000; Simoons 1994).

Journal

Journal of Cognition and CultureBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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