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Max Weber, das Charisma und Erwin Rohde

Max Weber, das Charisma und Erwin Rohde The pioneer of Fulfulde poetry in written Arabic/ajami was Shehu Uthmn bin Fodiye, who led a jihad in 1804 for the purification of Islam in Sokoto, northern Nigeria, also known as Hausa Land. His contemporaries followed his footsteps and the poetic tradition of resistance continues to the present day. This article examines poems that are concerned with Muslim responses to British colonial occupation in northern Nigeria, expressed in the Fulfulde language. The poets express that the myth of well- received and accepted colonial occupiers, propagated by the West, was in fact not true. Scholarly support is given to highlight the fierce battles, killings, and destructions of property that finally resulted in the imposition of colonial rule upon the people of northern Nigeria, replacing the more moderate Sokoto Caliphate.1 * I would like to thank immensely Dr. Mukhtar Abdullahi Bunza of the Department of History, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria, for his great contribution towards the fulfillment of this article. Dr. Bunza has offered me numerous materials for reference, without which this article would not have been rich enough to this standard. Special thanks go to Dr. Alkasum Abba, the Vice Chancellor of Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria, who http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Islamic Africa (continuation of Sudanic Africa) Brill

Max Weber, das Charisma und Erwin Rohde

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2013 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0803-0685
eISSN
2154-0993
DOI
10.5192/21540993040101
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The pioneer of Fulfulde poetry in written Arabic/ajami was Shehu Uthmn bin Fodiye, who led a jihad in 1804 for the purification of Islam in Sokoto, northern Nigeria, also known as Hausa Land. His contemporaries followed his footsteps and the poetic tradition of resistance continues to the present day. This article examines poems that are concerned with Muslim responses to British colonial occupation in northern Nigeria, expressed in the Fulfulde language. The poets express that the myth of well- received and accepted colonial occupiers, propagated by the West, was in fact not true. Scholarly support is given to highlight the fierce battles, killings, and destructions of property that finally resulted in the imposition of colonial rule upon the people of northern Nigeria, replacing the more moderate Sokoto Caliphate.1 * I would like to thank immensely Dr. Mukhtar Abdullahi Bunza of the Department of History, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria, for his great contribution towards the fulfillment of this article. Dr. Bunza has offered me numerous materials for reference, without which this article would not have been rich enough to this standard. Special thanks go to Dr. Alkasum Abba, the Vice Chancellor of Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria, who

Journal

Islamic Africa (continuation of Sudanic Africa)Brill

Published: Jun 3, 2013

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