Masters and servants: the American colonial model of child custody and control

Masters and servants: the American colonial model of child custody and control Masters and servants: the American colonial model of child custody and control MARY ANN MASON University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A. Introduction In 1620, the Virginia Company complained to Sir Robert Naunton, principal secretary of James I, that London street children were unwilling to be sent to Virginia colony as apprentices. The City of London have by act of their Common Council, appointed one hundred children out of their superfluous multitude to be transported to Virginia: there to be bound apprentices for certain years, and afterward with very beneficial conditions for the children ... Now it falleth out that among those children, sundry being ill disposed, and fitter for any remote place than for this city, declare their unwillingness to go to Virginia, of whom the City is especially desirous to be disburdened, and in Virginia under severe masters they may be brought to goodness. 1 Children who came to America as indentured servants without parents in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century were an important part of the story of settlement of the American colonies. More than half of all personal who came to the colonies south of New England were indentured servants, most servants were younger than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Children's Rights Brill

Masters and servants: the American colonial model of child custody and control

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1994 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0927-5568
eISSN
1571-8182
D.O.I.
10.1163/157181894X00204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Masters and servants: the American colonial model of child custody and control MARY ANN MASON University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A. Introduction In 1620, the Virginia Company complained to Sir Robert Naunton, principal secretary of James I, that London street children were unwilling to be sent to Virginia colony as apprentices. The City of London have by act of their Common Council, appointed one hundred children out of their superfluous multitude to be transported to Virginia: there to be bound apprentices for certain years, and afterward with very beneficial conditions for the children ... Now it falleth out that among those children, sundry being ill disposed, and fitter for any remote place than for this city, declare their unwillingness to go to Virginia, of whom the City is especially desirous to be disburdened, and in Virginia under severe masters they may be brought to goodness. 1 Children who came to America as indentured servants without parents in the seventeenth and early eighteenth century were an important part of the story of settlement of the American colonies. More than half of all personal who came to the colonies south of New England were indentured servants, most servants were younger than

Journal

The International Journal of Children's RightsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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