Lucretius' Explanation of Hearing in De Rerum Natura IV 524-562

Lucretius' Explanation of Hearing in De Rerum Natura IV 524-562 LUCRETIUS’ EXPLANATION OF HEARING IN DE RERUM NATURA IV 524 - 562*) by MIEKE H. KOENEN In De rerum natura IV 524-614, after an elaborate explanation of vision (IV 26-386), a highly poetic description of optical illusions (387-461) and a refutation of scepticism (469-521), Lucretius pre- sents his account of hearing and speech. As a detailed analysis of the whole account would become too extensive, the present paper focuses on the Ž rst half of Lucretius’ explanation (524-562); 1 ) it tries to formulate solutions to the textual problems and interpretational di Y culties involved and occasionally attention will be paid to Lucre- tius’ poetic phraseology. The Latin text (as printed in Bailey’s 1947 edition) runs as follows: Principio auditur sonus et vox omnis, in auris 525 insinuata suo pepulere ubi corpore sensum. corpoream quoque enim constare fatendumst et sonitum, quoniam possunt impellere sensus. praeterea radit vox fauces saepe facitque asperiora foras gradiens arteria clamor. 530 quippe per angustum turba maiore coorta ire foras ubi coeperunt primordia vocum, scilicet expletis quoque ianua raditur oris. haud igitur dubiumst quin voces verbaque constent corporeis e principiis, ut laedere possint. 535 nec te fallit item quid corporis auferat et quid detrahat http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

Lucretius' Explanation of Hearing in De Rerum Natura IV 524-562

Mnemosyne , Volume 52 (4): 434 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852599323283568
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LUCRETIUS’ EXPLANATION OF HEARING IN DE RERUM NATURA IV 524 - 562*) by MIEKE H. KOENEN In De rerum natura IV 524-614, after an elaborate explanation of vision (IV 26-386), a highly poetic description of optical illusions (387-461) and a refutation of scepticism (469-521), Lucretius pre- sents his account of hearing and speech. As a detailed analysis of the whole account would become too extensive, the present paper focuses on the Ž rst half of Lucretius’ explanation (524-562); 1 ) it tries to formulate solutions to the textual problems and interpretational di Y culties involved and occasionally attention will be paid to Lucre- tius’ poetic phraseology. The Latin text (as printed in Bailey’s 1947 edition) runs as follows: Principio auditur sonus et vox omnis, in auris 525 insinuata suo pepulere ubi corpore sensum. corpoream quoque enim constare fatendumst et sonitum, quoniam possunt impellere sensus. praeterea radit vox fauces saepe facitque asperiora foras gradiens arteria clamor. 530 quippe per angustum turba maiore coorta ire foras ubi coeperunt primordia vocum, scilicet expletis quoque ianua raditur oris. haud igitur dubiumst quin voces verbaque constent corporeis e principiis, ut laedere possint. 535 nec te fallit item quid corporis auferat et quid detrahat

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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