Life after Derrida: Anacoluthia and the Agrammaticality of Following

Life after Derrida: Anacoluthia and the Agrammaticality of Following LIFE AFTER DERRIDA: ANACOLUTHIA AND THE AGRAMMATICALITY OF FOLLOWING by SARAH DILLON University of St. Andrews A BSTRACT Written on Derrida’s “‘Le Parjure,’ Perhaps : Storytelling and Lying,” this essay takes the concept of the anacoluthon from Derrida’s text (as he has done from J. Hillis Miller, as he did from Proust) and—commenting on the fi gure of the woman in this male lineage—further invents the concept of the anacoluthon by demonstrating how its formal linguistic de fi nition provides a model for the event of reading and writing— of thinking—that Derrida so admires in Hillis Miller’s work and practices in his own. By employing this same reading practice in its own thinking, this essay does not respond to Derrida’s death in mourning, nor in thinking about mourning, but in the memory of thought. Produced out of Derrida’s work, the essay remains faithful to him only by simultaneously being faithful and unfaithful, thereby enacting the agrammaticality of following represented in and by the anacoluthon. we could not not be haunted by the memory we still had of him. We could not not know that we were in some way being observed internally by him, by the spectral vigilance http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Life after Derrida: Anacoluthia and the Agrammaticality of Following

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916406779165836
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LIFE AFTER DERRIDA: ANACOLUTHIA AND THE AGRAMMATICALITY OF FOLLOWING by SARAH DILLON University of St. Andrews A BSTRACT Written on Derrida’s “‘Le Parjure,’ Perhaps : Storytelling and Lying,” this essay takes the concept of the anacoluthon from Derrida’s text (as he has done from J. Hillis Miller, as he did from Proust) and—commenting on the fi gure of the woman in this male lineage—further invents the concept of the anacoluthon by demonstrating how its formal linguistic de fi nition provides a model for the event of reading and writing— of thinking—that Derrida so admires in Hillis Miller’s work and practices in his own. By employing this same reading practice in its own thinking, this essay does not respond to Derrida’s death in mourning, nor in thinking about mourning, but in the memory of thought. Produced out of Derrida’s work, the essay remains faithful to him only by simultaneously being faithful and unfaithful, thereby enacting the agrammaticality of following represented in and by the anacoluthon. we could not not be haunted by the memory we still had of him. We could not not know that we were in some way being observed internally by him, by the spectral vigilance

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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