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Legal Indicators for Social Inclusion of New Minorities Generated by Immigration

Legal Indicators for Social Inclusion of New Minorities Generated by Immigration I. INTRODUCTION In recent decades, most EU member states have experienced a marked increase in the number of third country nationals (TCNs) residing on their territory. Partly for political and humanitarian reasons, partly as a result of differing economic situations as well as the freedom of movement entailed by growing economic integration in Europe, an increas- ing number of people have settled with varying degrees of permanence in countries other than their countries of origin. This situation creates for the governments and other public authorities concerned the task of integrating such foreign residents into the communities in which they live - a problem which is all the more acute in the light of racist and xeno- phobic incidents which have often occurred and still occur. Since the late 1990s, the European Commission has acknowledged the importance of this theme: 'The integration of migrants is an imperative dictated by the democratic and humanitarian tradition of the member states and constitutes a fundamental aspect of any immigration policy. The integration of immigrants is essential to safeguard equilibrium in our societies. '* Following the conclusions of the Tampere European Council on the fair treatment of TCNs, it was agreed that the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Legal Indicators for Social Inclusion of New Minorities Generated by Immigration

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/221161103X00184
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION In recent decades, most EU member states have experienced a marked increase in the number of third country nationals (TCNs) residing on their territory. Partly for political and humanitarian reasons, partly as a result of differing economic situations as well as the freedom of movement entailed by growing economic integration in Europe, an increas- ing number of people have settled with varying degrees of permanence in countries other than their countries of origin. This situation creates for the governments and other public authorities concerned the task of integrating such foreign residents into the communities in which they live - a problem which is all the more acute in the light of racist and xeno- phobic incidents which have often occurred and still occur. Since the late 1990s, the European Commission has acknowledged the importance of this theme: 'The integration of migrants is an imperative dictated by the democratic and humanitarian tradition of the member states and constitutes a fundamental aspect of any immigration policy. The integration of immigrants is essential to safeguard equilibrium in our societies. '* Following the conclusions of the Tampere European Council on the fair treatment of TCNs, it was agreed that the

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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