LEARNING FOR LIFE: TRAINING MARSUPIALS TO RECOGNISE INTRODUCED PREDATORS

LEARNING FOR LIFE: TRAINING MARSUPIALS TO RECOGNISE INTRODUCED PREDATORS LEARNING FOR LIFE: TRAINING MARSUPIALS TO RECOGNISE INTRODUCED PREDATORS by IAN G. MCLEAN 1,2,3) , NATALIE T. SCHMITT 1) , PETER J. JARMAN 4) , COLLEEN DUNCAN 5) and C.D.L. WYNNE 6,7) ( 1 Dept of Zoology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia; 2 Dept of Zoology, University of Canterbury, P.O. Box 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand; 3 Natural Heritage, Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, West Perth, Perth, WA 6005, Australia; 4 Ecosystem Management, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia; 5 Dept of Biology, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; 6 Dept of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia) (Acc. 6-VI-2000) Summary Raising endangered species in captivity for reintroduction necessarily results in animals that lack appropriate skills for coping with problems to be faced in the wild, such as predators. Using classical conditioning techniques involving linking fear of a live dog with the image of a fox, we demonstrate an adjusted fear response for two wallaby species (rufous bettongs Aepyprymnus rufescens , quokkas Setonix brachyurus ). No differences in response to the fox were found for wild-caught and captive-bornbettongs, even though wild-caught subjects were likely to have encountered canids prior to capture. Attempts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

LEARNING FOR LIFE: TRAINING MARSUPIALS TO RECOGNISE INTRODUCED PREDATORS

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2000 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853900501971
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LEARNING FOR LIFE: TRAINING MARSUPIALS TO RECOGNISE INTRODUCED PREDATORS by IAN G. MCLEAN 1,2,3) , NATALIE T. SCHMITT 1) , PETER J. JARMAN 4) , COLLEEN DUNCAN 5) and C.D.L. WYNNE 6,7) ( 1 Dept of Zoology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia; 2 Dept of Zoology, University of Canterbury, P.O. Box 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand; 3 Natural Heritage, Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, West Perth, Perth, WA 6005, Australia; 4 Ecosystem Management, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia; 5 Dept of Biology, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada; 6 Dept of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia) (Acc. 6-VI-2000) Summary Raising endangered species in captivity for reintroduction necessarily results in animals that lack appropriate skills for coping with problems to be faced in the wild, such as predators. Using classical conditioning techniques involving linking fear of a live dog with the image of a fox, we demonstrate an adjusted fear response for two wallaby species (rufous bettongs Aepyprymnus rufescens , quokkas Setonix brachyurus ). No differences in response to the fox were found for wild-caught and captive-bornbettongs, even though wild-caught subjects were likely to have encountered canids prior to capture. Attempts

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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