Landmarks help guide attention during visual search

Landmarks help guide attention during visual search Spatial Vision , Vol. 17, No. 4-5, pp. 497 – 510 (2004)  VSP 2004. Also available online - www.vsppub.com Landmarks help guide attention during visual search MATTHEW S. PETERSON 1 , ∗ , WALTER R. BOOT 2 , ARTHUR F. KRAMER 2 and JASON S. McCARLEY 3 1 Department of Psychology, George Mason University, MS 3F5, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, Virginia, VA 22030, USA 2 Beckman Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA 3 Department of Psychology, Mississippi State University, USA Received 29 May 2003; revised 24 November 2003; accepted 29 November 2003 Abstract —Using a novel visual search paradigm McCarley et al. (2003) concluded that the oculomo- tor system keeps a history of 3–4 previously attended objects. However, their displays were visually sparse, denying participants structural information which might be used during normal search. This might have underestimated memory capacity. To examine this possibility, we included landmarks in the same search paradigm. Previously examined items were re-examined less frequently when landmarks were present compared to when they were absent. Results indicate that objects in the envi- ronment that share no features with search items are used as external support to aid memory in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Landmarks help guide attention during visual search

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/landmarks-help-guide-attention-during-visual-search-UeQhUM3PCd
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/1568568041920230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial Vision , Vol. 17, No. 4-5, pp. 497 – 510 (2004)  VSP 2004. Also available online - www.vsppub.com Landmarks help guide attention during visual search MATTHEW S. PETERSON 1 , ∗ , WALTER R. BOOT 2 , ARTHUR F. KRAMER 2 and JASON S. McCARLEY 3 1 Department of Psychology, George Mason University, MS 3F5, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, Virginia, VA 22030, USA 2 Beckman Institute and Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA 3 Department of Psychology, Mississippi State University, USA Received 29 May 2003; revised 24 November 2003; accepted 29 November 2003 Abstract —Using a novel visual search paradigm McCarley et al. (2003) concluded that the oculomo- tor system keeps a history of 3–4 previously attended objects. However, their displays were visually sparse, denying participants structural information which might be used during normal search. This might have underestimated memory capacity. To examine this possibility, we included landmarks in the same search paradigm. Previously examined items were re-examined less frequently when landmarks were present compared to when they were absent. Results indicate that objects in the envi- ronment that share no features with search items are used as external support to aid memory in

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

Keywords: ATTENTION; VISUAL SEARCH

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off