Lack of assortative mating between incipient species of stickleback from a hybrid zone

Lack of assortative mating between incipient species of stickleback from a hybrid zone Lack of assortative mating between incipient species of stickleback from a hybrid zone F. C. Jones 1) , C. Brown 2) & V. A. Braithwaite 3) (Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK) (Accepted: 20 January 2008) Summary Both premating and postmating barriers to gene flow can contribute to reproductive isolation but the relative role of these factors, particularly in the early stages of speciation, is not well understood. Evidence suggests that factors contributing to assortative mating and, thus, the development and maintenance of divergent species, can be ecology-dependent. Here, we present results from a study of assortative mating between recently diverged anadromous and freshwater sticklebacks conducted in semi-natural conditions. Sympatric anadromous and freshwater sticklebacks were sampled from a contact zone and multiple male and female morphs were allowed to breed in replicate ponds. Mate choice was determined using genetic markers to assign parents to offspring. Contrary to laboratory-based studies of sticklebacks, after allowing for differences in the propensity of the morphotypes to mate, we found no evidence of assortative mating. Furthermore, there was no evidence of size assortative mating, but rather a general female ‘preference’ to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Lack of assortative mating between incipient species of stickleback from a hybrid zone

Behaviour , Volume 145 (4-5): 463 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853908792451520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lack of assortative mating between incipient species of stickleback from a hybrid zone F. C. Jones 1) , C. Brown 2) & V. A. Braithwaite 3) (Institute of Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK) (Accepted: 20 January 2008) Summary Both premating and postmating barriers to gene flow can contribute to reproductive isolation but the relative role of these factors, particularly in the early stages of speciation, is not well understood. Evidence suggests that factors contributing to assortative mating and, thus, the development and maintenance of divergent species, can be ecology-dependent. Here, we present results from a study of assortative mating between recently diverged anadromous and freshwater sticklebacks conducted in semi-natural conditions. Sympatric anadromous and freshwater sticklebacks were sampled from a contact zone and multiple male and female morphs were allowed to breed in replicate ponds. Mate choice was determined using genetic markers to assign parents to offspring. Contrary to laboratory-based studies of sticklebacks, after allowing for differences in the propensity of the morphotypes to mate, we found no evidence of assortative mating. Furthermore, there was no evidence of size assortative mating, but rather a general female ‘preference’ to

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: SEXUAL SELECTION; SPECIATION; HYBRIDISATION; REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION; ASSORTATIVE MATING; GASTEROSTEUS ACULEATUS; THREESPINED STICKLEBACK; MICROSATELLITE

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