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King Diplomacy for Perpetual Crisis

King Diplomacy for Perpetual Crisis Traditionally, we have been able to count on national leaders to resolve international crises — or at least to hope that they will. International (and national) crises are generally the almost exclusive purview of national leaders. Citizens expect them to staunchly grasp the helm and steer the national ship away from the threatening shoals. Towering leaders such as Winston Churchill, Abraham Lincoln, David Ben-Gurion, Charles de Gaulle, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt became part of the pantheon by showing their mettle in the international crises and challenges that threatened their nations during their time in power. Others, including Neville Chamberlain, Golda Meir, Lyndon Johnson, Nikita Khrushchev and Jimmy Carter, lost authority and their mandate after what was publicly understood (rightly or wrongly) as their failed leadership during times of crisis and war. Leadership is assessed mainly in the face of domestic and, even more so, international crisis, which is when it essentially either thrives or wanes. On the other hand, diplomats are the agents of routine, ceremonial custom and inter-state maintenance. The public image of everlasting cocktail parties is a gross distortion of the diplomat’s life. Diplomats are the back-stage managers of inter-state relations: those who toil behind the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

King Diplomacy for Perpetual Crisis

The Hague Journal of Diplomacy , Volume 10 (1): 10 – Jan 27, 2015

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Forum
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/1871191X-12341301
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditionally, we have been able to count on national leaders to resolve international crises — or at least to hope that they will. International (and national) crises are generally the almost exclusive purview of national leaders. Citizens expect them to staunchly grasp the helm and steer the national ship away from the threatening shoals. Towering leaders such as Winston Churchill, Abraham Lincoln, David Ben-Gurion, Charles de Gaulle, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt became part of the pantheon by showing their mettle in the international crises and challenges that threatened their nations during their time in power. Others, including Neville Chamberlain, Golda Meir, Lyndon Johnson, Nikita Khrushchev and Jimmy Carter, lost authority and their mandate after what was publicly understood (rightly or wrongly) as their failed leadership during times of crisis and war. Leadership is assessed mainly in the face of domestic and, even more so, international crisis, which is when it essentially either thrives or wanes. On the other hand, diplomats are the agents of routine, ceremonial custom and inter-state maintenance. The public image of everlasting cocktail parties is a gross distortion of the diplomat’s life. Diplomats are the back-stage managers of inter-state relations: those who toil behind the

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Jan 27, 2015

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