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King Artaxerxes’ Aegean Policy

King Artaxerxes’ Aegean Policy Ernst Badian has argued that it would have been ideologically unacceptable for the great king of Persia to submit to negotiations with Athens and to bind himself by oath to the resulting Peace of Callias. This interpretation, however, is the result of the later Greek conception of the Peace of Callias as an Athenian victory over Persia, and the Peace of Antalcidas as a Persian humiliation of Greece. In this paper, I argue that the Achaemenid kings of Persia inherited notions of kinship, empire, and diplomacy from their Neo-Assyrian predecessors, and therefore saw treaties as an honorable and legitimate tool of empire. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Persianate Studies Brill

King Artaxerxes’ Aegean Policy

Journal of Persianate Studies , Volume 10 (1): 25 – Jun 1, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1874-7094
eISSN
1874-7167
DOI
10.1163/18747167-12341304
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ernst Badian has argued that it would have been ideologically unacceptable for the great king of Persia to submit to negotiations with Athens and to bind himself by oath to the resulting Peace of Callias. This interpretation, however, is the result of the later Greek conception of the Peace of Callias as an Athenian victory over Persia, and the Peace of Antalcidas as a Persian humiliation of Greece. In this paper, I argue that the Achaemenid kings of Persia inherited notions of kinship, empire, and diplomacy from their Neo-Assyrian predecessors, and therefore saw treaties as an honorable and legitimate tool of empire.

Journal

Journal of Persianate StudiesBrill

Published: Jun 1, 2017

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