Kin biased investment in wild chimpanzees

Kin biased investment in wild chimpanzees Kin biased investment in wild chimpanzees Julia Lehmann 2) , Gisela Fickenscher & Christophe Boesch 1) (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany) (Accepted: 6 June 2006) Summary Kin selection theory predicts that recognition and preferences for kin can be highly benefi- cial. However, evidence of recognition of offspring by fathers in mammals has accumulated very slowly. Especially, in multi-male groups with a promiscuous mating system, like the chimpanzee, where offspring survival does not seem to depend on paternal care, paternal kin recognition has not yet been observed. In this study, we examined whether adult males of a wild chimpanzee community show recognition of their offspring (as determined genetically) and whether infants prefer to interact with kin rather than with unrelated peers. Our analy- sis utilises up to 14 years of observational data to investigate if adult males associate more frequently and behave less aggressively with females that carry their offspring. Furthermore, we use grooming and play behaviour to establish whether adult males and youngsters show preferences for kin versus non-kin. We found that, adult males did not associate preferentially with females with which they had offspring, but they were generally less aggressive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Kin biased investment in wild chimpanzees

Behaviour, Volume 143 (8): 931 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853906778623635
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Kin biased investment in wild chimpanzees Julia Lehmann 2) , Gisela Fickenscher & Christophe Boesch 1) (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany) (Accepted: 6 June 2006) Summary Kin selection theory predicts that recognition and preferences for kin can be highly benefi- cial. However, evidence of recognition of offspring by fathers in mammals has accumulated very slowly. Especially, in multi-male groups with a promiscuous mating system, like the chimpanzee, where offspring survival does not seem to depend on paternal care, paternal kin recognition has not yet been observed. In this study, we examined whether adult males of a wild chimpanzee community show recognition of their offspring (as determined genetically) and whether infants prefer to interact with kin rather than with unrelated peers. Our analy- sis utilises up to 14 years of observational data to investigate if adult males associate more frequently and behave less aggressively with females that carry their offspring. Furthermore, we use grooming and play behaviour to establish whether adult males and youngsters show preferences for kin versus non-kin. We found that, adult males did not associate preferentially with females with which they had offspring, but they were generally less aggressive

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: PATERNAL CARE; PLAY; KIN PREFERENCE; CHIMPANZEE; KIN RECOGNITION

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