KΩIΔApion: a Reply

KΩIΔApion: a Reply MISCELLANEA K Ω I ∆ APION: A REPLY In a recent article published in this journal 1 ) Mr. Robert J. Penella resurrects Prof. Cedric Whitman's notion 2) that in the well-known scene in Aristophanes' Frogs (I I98 ff.), where Aeschylus ruins six Euripidean prologues with a À'YJxu8wv, a?xu6cov is a double- entendre referring secondarily to the phallus. I have attempted elsewhere 3) to demonstrate at length both the utter lack of evidence for this interpretation and its dramatic inappropriateness for the scene in question, and so I shall not repeat my earlier arguments here. But since Mr. Penella has called some of my conclusions into question, I would like to offer a few clarifications. ( ) Penella, following Whitman, asserts that Aristophanes intend- ed the phallic connotations of x*x6010v as a "criticism of the emasculated new tragedy": each Euripidean prologue "loses his masculinity". Since the ÀYJxu8wv is associated with athletes it would be a "symbol of masculinity "4). Penella says that "this is precisely how À?xu8oe;; is employed in the Thesmophoriazusae, 139, where it is opposed to cr'Tp6cp?ov (brassiere), used here as a symbol of feminini- ty". But that is not "precisely" how it is used in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

KΩIΔApion: a Reply

Mnemosyne, Volume 27 (3): 293 – Jan 1, 1974

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1974 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852574X00089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MISCELLANEA K Ω I ∆ APION: A REPLY In a recent article published in this journal 1 ) Mr. Robert J. Penella resurrects Prof. Cedric Whitman's notion 2) that in the well-known scene in Aristophanes' Frogs (I I98 ff.), where Aeschylus ruins six Euripidean prologues with a À'YJxu8wv, a?xu6cov is a double- entendre referring secondarily to the phallus. I have attempted elsewhere 3) to demonstrate at length both the utter lack of evidence for this interpretation and its dramatic inappropriateness for the scene in question, and so I shall not repeat my earlier arguments here. But since Mr. Penella has called some of my conclusions into question, I would like to offer a few clarifications. ( ) Penella, following Whitman, asserts that Aristophanes intend- ed the phallic connotations of x*x6010v as a "criticism of the emasculated new tragedy": each Euripidean prologue "loses his masculinity". Since the ÀYJxu8wv is associated with athletes it would be a "symbol of masculinity "4). Penella says that "this is precisely how À?xu8oe;; is employed in the Thesmophoriazusae, 139, where it is opposed to cr'Tp6cp?ov (brassiere), used here as a symbol of feminini- ty". But that is not "precisely" how it is used in

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1974

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