Jonathan HARRISON: Hume’s Moral Epistemology , Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press, Oxford/London 1976, XII + 131 pages.

Jonathan HARRISON: Hume’s Moral Epistemology , Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press,... Jonathan HARRISON: Hume's Moral Epistemology, Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press, Oxford/London 1976, XII + 131 pages. Professor Harrison c10ses his study of Hume's moral epistemology on a mildly apologetic note: "Finally, since I have been throughout fairly critical of Hume's views and arguments ... may I say that I think that the Scottish Hume was the greatest of British philosophers, and one of the greatest of philosophers who have lived anywhere at any time. If my own myopie gaze and passion for precise c1assification and distinction have served to obscure that fact from my readers, I can only implore them ... to read [Hume] for themselves." (p. 125) It seems unlikely, I think, that anyone philosophically knowledgeable will object to the fact that Harrison has criticized Hume's views and arguments; I certainly do not, for not only does philosophy proceed by criticism, but there is also no deficiency of shortcomings in Hume's philosophy. However, it seems to me that Harrison has not been "fairly critical" in the second and more important sense of the phrase, and hence I do object to his analysis and criticisms because they are generally unsatisfactory. The key to the book's failure is adequately http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grazer Philosophische Studien Brill

Jonathan HARRISON: Hume’s Moral Epistemology , Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press, Oxford/London 1976, XII + 131 pages.

Jonathan HARRISON: Hume’s Moral Epistemology , Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press, Oxford/London 1976, XII + 131 pages.


Jonathan HARRISON: Hume's Moral Epistemology, Clarendon Press; Oxford University Press, Oxford/London 1976, XII + 131 pages. Professor Harrison c10ses his study of Hume's moral epistemology on a mildly apologetic note: "Finally, since I have been throughout fairly critical of Hume's views and arguments ... may I say that I think that the Scottish Hume was the greatest of British philosophers, and one of the greatest of philosophers who have lived anywhere at any time. If my own myopie gaze and passion for precise c1assification and distinction have served to obscure that fact from my readers, I can only implore them ... to read [Hume] for themselves." (p. 125) It seems unlikely, I think, that anyone philosophically knowledgeable will object to the fact that Harrison has criticized Hume's views and arguments; I certainly do not, for not only does philosophy proceed by criticism, but there is also no deficiency of shortcomings in Hume's philosophy. However, it seems to me that Harrison has not been "fairly critical" in the second and more important sense of the phrase, and hence I do object to his analysis and criticisms because they are generally unsatisfactory. The key to the book's failure is adequately revealed in the descriptive paragraph found on the back cover. There it is said that this book is a "detailed analysis and rigorously critical examination" of Book 111, Part I of Hume's Treatise and those parts of the Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals that are also revelant to Hume's ans wer to the question "How do we know the difference between right and wrong ... virtue and vice? " The intention, it is said, is to assess "Hume's arguments against ethical rationalism and the different strands in his positive views ... in the light of advances which have been made in moral epistemology since he wrote." This, of course, is a fully acceptable program. But we...
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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© Copyright 1977 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0165-9227
eISSN
1875-6735
D.O.I.
10.1163/18756735-90000068
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

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