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John R. Shook and Joseph Margolis, eds. A Companion to Pragmatism . Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2006. xii + 431 pp. Cloth ISBN 1-4051-1621-8

John R. Shook and Joseph Margolis, eds. A Companion to Pragmatism . Malden, Mass.: Blackwell,... This volume of thirty-eight essays, by an impressive list of contributors, is a resource for anyone wishing to learn about pragmatism in general, its history, as well as the particular philosophies of the classical and more recent pragmatists. There are essays in A Companion to Pragmatism that discuss pragmatic philosophers in the context of the history of philosophy. For instance, Douglas Anderson in "Peirce and Cartesian Rationalism" argues that Peirce's rejection of Cartesianism "was radical but not wholesale" (161). In other words, what Peirce inherits from modern philosophy is as important to our understanding of his philosophy as the ways he breaks away from the tradition. There are several essays in this collection that stress both the break and the continuity with the tradition of all the classical pragmatist figures. Timothy Sprigge in "James, Empiricism, and Absolute Idealism" shows the historical continuity between James and idealism. The historical and philosophical relations between Hegel and the pragmatist are explored in Kenneth Westphal's essay "Hegel and Realism." In "Expressivism and Mead' Social Self" Mitchell Aboulafia argues that the pragmatists cannot be fully appreciated unless they are understood against the backdrop of the enlighment and expressivism. Thomas Alexander argues in "Dewey, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

John R. Shook and Joseph Margolis, eds. A Companion to Pragmatism . Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2006. xii + 431 pp. Cloth ISBN 1-4051-1621-8

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 4 (2): 120 – Apr 21, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2007 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This volume of thirty-eight essays, by an impressive list of contributors, is a resource for anyone wishing to learn about pragmatism in general, its history, as well as the particular philosophies of the classical and more recent pragmatists. There are essays in A Companion to Pragmatism that discuss pragmatic philosophers in the context of the history of philosophy. For instance, Douglas Anderson in "Peirce and Cartesian Rationalism" argues that Peirce's rejection of Cartesianism "was radical but not wholesale" (161). In other words, what Peirce inherits from modern philosophy is as important to our understanding of his philosophy as the ways he breaks away from the tradition. There are several essays in this collection that stress both the break and the continuity with the tradition of all the classical pragmatist figures. Timothy Sprigge in "James, Empiricism, and Absolute Idealism" shows the historical continuity between James and idealism. The historical and philosophical relations between Hegel and the pragmatist are explored in Kenneth Westphal's essay "Hegel and Realism." In "Expressivism and Mead' Social Self" Mitchell Aboulafia argues that the pragmatists cannot be fully appreciated unless they are understood against the backdrop of the enlighment and expressivism. Thomas Alexander argues in "Dewey,

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2007

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