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John Dewey’s Democratic Intentionality

John Dewey’s Democratic Intentionality Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 2 (December 2011), 123­144 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Jerome A. Popp John Dewey's analyses of the relationships among ethical theory, intellectual-growth, and the nature of democratic societies are of continuing interest to social and political philosophers, especially those who hold an evolutionary view of these inquiries. The ontological analysis of society and social facts, recently advanced by John Searle, provides us with an alternative way to approach Dewey's thought that is at variance with traditional Deweyan scholarship. While Dewey's arguments are not changed, through Searle's social ontology we can see them differently, which further reveals the complex nature of democratic intentionality. 1. Introduction A significant area of investigation within contemporary philosophy is centered on John Searle's ontological theory of society, which may be thought of as a structural template that identifies the basic constitutive components of every society, and in terms of which the existence of any society is explained. The theory is useful in many ways, not the least of which is the explanation of how institutions come into being, and how a deontology is infused within them. Searle's ontological account is committed to no particular political philosophy, and none of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

John Dewey’s Democratic Intentionality

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 8 (2): 123 – Apr 21, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000206
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 2 (December 2011), 123­144 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Jerome A. Popp John Dewey's analyses of the relationships among ethical theory, intellectual-growth, and the nature of democratic societies are of continuing interest to social and political philosophers, especially those who hold an evolutionary view of these inquiries. The ontological analysis of society and social facts, recently advanced by John Searle, provides us with an alternative way to approach Dewey's thought that is at variance with traditional Deweyan scholarship. While Dewey's arguments are not changed, through Searle's social ontology we can see them differently, which further reveals the complex nature of democratic intentionality. 1. Introduction A significant area of investigation within contemporary philosophy is centered on John Searle's ontological theory of society, which may be thought of as a structural template that identifies the basic constitutive components of every society, and in terms of which the existence of any society is explained. The theory is useful in many ways, not the least of which is the explanation of how institutions come into being, and how a deontology is infused within them. Searle's ontological account is committed to no particular political philosophy, and none of the

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2011

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