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Iver Neumann (2012).

Iver Neumann (2012). At Home with the Diplomats: Inside a European Foreign Ministry . Ithaca, NY: CornellUniversity Press, ISBN 978-0-8014-7765-2, 216 pp., us$ 24.95. Iver Neumann’s distinguished career has spanned the academic and professional worlds, including a spell in Oxford and two stints at the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (mfa) around the turn of the millennium. With this book, Neumann, the recently appointed Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, takes on the ambitious task of providing a ‘historically informed ethnography of diplomacy, in which I ask what diplomats do and how they come to do it’. Based primarily on his experience at the Norwegian mfa, and deploying an anthropologist’s perspective, the result is a readable, slim volume that is informative, intriguing and thought-provoking. This perhaps begs the question of whether the mfa (‘at home’) is the ideal place to study diplomats. Like any species, diplomats might best be considered in their natural habitat, and in the diplomat’s case, that is ‘abroad’ — almost anywhere but home. Nonetheless, Neumann manages to extrapolate a great deal, and if there are parts of the book that may seem obvious to the ‘insider’, this probably http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/1871191X-12341271
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At Home with the Diplomats: Inside a European Foreign Ministry . Ithaca, NY: CornellUniversity Press, ISBN 978-0-8014-7765-2, 216 pp., us$ 24.95. Iver Neumann’s distinguished career has spanned the academic and professional worlds, including a spell in Oxford and two stints at the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (mfa) around the turn of the millennium. With this book, Neumann, the recently appointed Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, takes on the ambitious task of providing a ‘historically informed ethnography of diplomacy, in which I ask what diplomats do and how they come to do it’. Based primarily on his experience at the Norwegian mfa, and deploying an anthropologist’s perspective, the result is a readable, slim volume that is informative, intriguing and thought-provoking. This perhaps begs the question of whether the mfa (‘at home’) is the ideal place to study diplomats. Like any species, diplomats might best be considered in their natural habitat, and in the diplomat’s case, that is ‘abroad’ — almost anywhere but home. Nonetheless, Neumann manages to extrapolate a great deal, and if there are parts of the book that may seem obvious to the ‘insider’, this probably

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2014

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