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Investment Rules

Investment Rules and I. INTRODUCTION The United States has the largest stock of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) in the world. In 2001 (the most recent year for which data is available), total U.S.-owned foreign investments were almost US$ 1.6 trillion. This is almost twice as much as the second-largest source of FI)I, the United Kingdom, which owned just under US$ 900 billion worth of assets abroad. In 2003, total outflows of FDI from the United States were approximately US$ 174 billion (OECD, 2004). Given the magnitude of U.S. Fm, the treatment of U.S. investors abroad is an important priority for policymakers in the United States. This policymaking has two main goals: (i) to increase the investment opportunities open to non-nationals in host countries; and (ii) to protect those investments from capricious acts of governments. This debate is commonly characterized by a North-South divide. Developed countries typically are capital exporters and want strong protection provided to their investors. Policymakers in the United States also want to ensure that their investors arc not kept out of lucrative markets. While these policymakers would like to see their citizens afforded the same level of treatment abroad as they receive domestically, developing countries traditionally http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

Investment Rules

Journal of World Investment and Trade , Volume 7 (1): 19 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
DOI
10.1163/221190006X00108
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

and I. INTRODUCTION The United States has the largest stock of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) in the world. In 2001 (the most recent year for which data is available), total U.S.-owned foreign investments were almost US$ 1.6 trillion. This is almost twice as much as the second-largest source of FI)I, the United Kingdom, which owned just under US$ 900 billion worth of assets abroad. In 2003, total outflows of FDI from the United States were approximately US$ 174 billion (OECD, 2004). Given the magnitude of U.S. Fm, the treatment of U.S. investors abroad is an important priority for policymakers in the United States. This policymaking has two main goals: (i) to increase the investment opportunities open to non-nationals in host countries; and (ii) to protect those investments from capricious acts of governments. This debate is commonly characterized by a North-South divide. Developed countries typically are capital exporters and want strong protection provided to their investors. Policymakers in the United States also want to ensure that their investors arc not kept out of lucrative markets. While these policymakers would like to see their citizens afforded the same level of treatment abroad as they receive domestically, developing countries traditionally

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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