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Introduction to Vestibular Cognition Special Issue: Progress in Vestibular Cognition

Introduction to Vestibular Cognition Special Issue: Progress in Vestibular Cognition “ How many senses do you have? ” Most of us would probably respond with the traditional five senses we were taught in school: sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. However, there is an additional sensory modality that is essential in almost all our behaviours. The vestibular system is a sophisticated set of organs located in the inner ear. It comprises the semicircular canals, which detect rotational movements of the head in three-dimensional space, and the otolith organs, which code translational acceleration, including the orientation of the head relative to the gravitational vertical. Most scientists consider the vestibular system as an organ specialized for balance, orientation and control of eye movements. However, vestibular inputs are always on and turn out to be involved in almost all our interactions with the external world in ways that go far beyond these fundamental reflexes. Vestibular signals have extensive projections throughout the cerebral cortex, and can potentially influence any behaviours that involve relating to external space. Over the last decade, emerging studies have demonstrated that sensory information provided by the vestibular system is deeply involved in several cognitive processes. This special issue, which contains both reviews and original articles, focuses on vestibular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013) Brill

Introduction to Vestibular Cognition Special Issue: Progress in Vestibular Cognition

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Subject
Introduction
ISSN
2213-4794
eISSN
2213-4808
DOI
10.1163/22134808-00002508
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

“ How many senses do you have? ” Most of us would probably respond with the traditional five senses we were taught in school: sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. However, there is an additional sensory modality that is essential in almost all our behaviours. The vestibular system is a sophisticated set of organs located in the inner ear. It comprises the semicircular canals, which detect rotational movements of the head in three-dimensional space, and the otolith organs, which code translational acceleration, including the orientation of the head relative to the gravitational vertical. Most scientists consider the vestibular system as an organ specialized for balance, orientation and control of eye movements. However, vestibular inputs are always on and turn out to be involved in almost all our interactions with the external world in ways that go far beyond these fundamental reflexes. Vestibular signals have extensive projections throughout the cerebral cortex, and can potentially influence any behaviours that involve relating to external space. Over the last decade, emerging studies have demonstrated that sensory information provided by the vestibular system is deeply involved in several cognitive processes. This special issue, which contains both reviews and original articles, focuses on vestibular

Journal

Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2015

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