Introduction to the Pakistani Legal System, with special reference to the Law of Contract

Introduction to the Pakistani Legal System, with special reference to the Law of Contract 1 THE LEGAL SYSTEM OF PAKISTAN The legal system in Pakistan is derived from the English model through the adoption of the laws and structures of British India, itself a codified legal system based on nineteenth century English law. As a result, the legal system and much of the substantive law of Pakistan will be familiar to any Common Law lawyer. The substantive law of Pakistan is derived from the English Common Law. In addition, Pakistan is an Islamic Republic. Although Pakistan is presently undergoing a change in its jurisprudence, this paper sets out the law of Pakistan as it is rather than attempting to consider what the law might become in the future. 1.1 Judicial system The structure of the legal system of Pakistan is based on the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan of 12 April 1973, which was brought into force on 14 August 1973 under its Article 265. Pakistan is a federation consist- ing of four Provinces: Punjab, Baluchistan, Sindh and North-West Frontier and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (see Art. 1 as substituted by the Constitution (First Amendment) Act 1974, No. 33 of 1974). The judicial structure is marked by a hierarchy http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law Online Brill

Introduction to the Pakistani Legal System, with special reference to the Law of Contract

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
Copyright 1996 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1384-2935
eISSN
2211-2987
D.O.I.
10.1163/221129895X00065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 THE LEGAL SYSTEM OF PAKISTAN The legal system in Pakistan is derived from the English model through the adoption of the laws and structures of British India, itself a codified legal system based on nineteenth century English law. As a result, the legal system and much of the substantive law of Pakistan will be familiar to any Common Law lawyer. The substantive law of Pakistan is derived from the English Common Law. In addition, Pakistan is an Islamic Republic. Although Pakistan is presently undergoing a change in its jurisprudence, this paper sets out the law of Pakistan as it is rather than attempting to consider what the law might become in the future. 1.1 Judicial system The structure of the legal system of Pakistan is based on the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan of 12 April 1973, which was brought into force on 14 August 1973 under its Article 265. Pakistan is a federation consist- ing of four Provinces: Punjab, Baluchistan, Sindh and North-West Frontier and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (see Art. 1 as substituted by the Constitution (First Amendment) Act 1974, No. 33 of 1974). The judicial structure is marked by a hierarchy

Journal

Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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