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Introduction The Rise of Parliamentary Diplomacy in International Politics

Introduction The Rise of Parliamentary Diplomacy in International Politics Following the end of the Cold War and the demise of the bipolar world, intensified globalization of economics, finance, politics and security caused the shape and content of international affairs to change dramatically. The 9/11 attacks, the rise of the so-called brics group of countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), and financial and other crises at the global and regional levels are testaments of this relentless process. All of this transforms traditional intergovernmental diplomacy. 1 The role of a diplomat — consisting of communication, reporting, policy analysis, negotiation and representation — is now more complex. This is because of: (a) the emergence of new tasks, such as acquiring expertise in specific policy areas, including global economic governance, climate change and terrorism; and (b) the presence and activity of new actors, such as non-state agencies, lobbies, parliamentary bodies, civil society, academics, the media, cities, sub-state regions, celebrities, foundations and think tanks. As a result, new types of diplomacy have come into being in the form of economic diplomacy, 2 cultural diplomacy, 3 public diplomacy, 4 paradiplomacy, 5 celebrities’ diplomacy, 6 sports diplomacy 7 and parliamentary diplomacy. In reaction, ‘parliaments simply had no choice but to engage in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

Introduction The Rise of Parliamentary Diplomacy in International Politics

The Hague Journal of Diplomacy , Volume 11 (2-3): 105 – Mar 11, 2016

Introduction The Rise of Parliamentary Diplomacy in International Politics


Following the end of the Cold War and the demise of the bipolar world, intensified globalization of economics, finance, politics and security caused the shape and content of international affairs to change dramatically. The 9/11 attacks, the rise of the so-called brics group of countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), and financial and other crises at the global and regional levels are testaments of this relentless process. All of this transforms traditional intergovernmental diplomacy. 1 The role of a diplomat — consisting of communication, reporting, policy analysis, negotiation and representation — is now more complex. This is because of: (a) the emergence of new tasks, such as acquiring expertise in specific policy areas, including global economic governance, climate change and terrorism; and (b) the presence and activity of new actors, such as non-state agencies, lobbies, parliamentary bodies, civil society, academics, the media, cities, sub-state regions, celebrities, foundations and think tanks. As a result, new types of diplomacy have come into being in the form of economic diplomacy, 2 cultural diplomacy, 3 public diplomacy, 4 paradiplomacy, 5 celebrities’ diplomacy, 6 sports diplomacy 7 and parliamentary diplomacy. In reaction, ‘parliaments simply had no choice but to engage in multilateral negotiations’. 8 As underlined by Speaker of the South African Parliament Baleka Mbete, parliamentary diplomacy is a ‘continuation of engagement on national issues’ and is inspired by domestic constitutional values. 9 An important aspect of the transfer of policy-making beyond the borders of a single state is the increased role of parliamentarians and parliamentary bodies in world affairs. 10 These phenomena carry their own challenges and opportunities for their protagonists, so there is a necessity to find new forms of transnational representativeness. 11 This necessity is rooted in the mismatch between...
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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/1871191X-12341344
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Following the end of the Cold War and the demise of the bipolar world, intensified globalization of economics, finance, politics and security caused the shape and content of international affairs to change dramatically. The 9/11 attacks, the rise of the so-called brics group of countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), and financial and other crises at the global and regional levels are testaments of this relentless process. All of this transforms traditional intergovernmental diplomacy. 1 The role of a diplomat — consisting of communication, reporting, policy analysis, negotiation and representation — is now more complex. This is because of: (a) the emergence of new tasks, such as acquiring expertise in specific policy areas, including global economic governance, climate change and terrorism; and (b) the presence and activity of new actors, such as non-state agencies, lobbies, parliamentary bodies, civil society, academics, the media, cities, sub-state regions, celebrities, foundations and think tanks. As a result, new types of diplomacy have come into being in the form of economic diplomacy, 2 cultural diplomacy, 3 public diplomacy, 4 paradiplomacy, 5 celebrities’ diplomacy, 6 sports diplomacy 7 and parliamentary diplomacy. In reaction, ‘parliaments simply had no choice but to engage in

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Mar 11, 2016

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