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Introduction

Introduction What is the future of the philosophical study of hermeneutics? This question no doubt continues to resonate in part due to the recent death of the philosophers most associated with hermeneutics in our times, first Hans-Georg Gadamer a little more than a decade ago and then Paul Ricoeur not long after. Of course, this question was also made all the more resonant with the death of their contemporary, Jacques Derrida, who was not only of incomparable importance in his own right but also an irreplaceable interlocutor for Gadamer and, in turn, a touchstone for so many others associated with hermeneutics. What, it may be asked, are the prospects for hermeneutics now that these figures are gone? Does the future of hermeneutics belong first of all to the Buchstabenphilosoph , the philosopher of the letter, who would abstract from history by the aim simply to identify, clarify, and adjudicate theses about the purported positions of these now departed forebearers? Or, on the contrary, does the future of hermeneutics instead hold new possibilities that both develop further and even expand beyond the letter of the achievements of their predecessors? Fortunately, the philosophical study of hermeneutics has seen several recent contributions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Discussion Günter Figal’s Objectivity
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/15691640-12341277
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

What is the future of the philosophical study of hermeneutics? This question no doubt continues to resonate in part due to the recent death of the philosophers most associated with hermeneutics in our times, first Hans-Georg Gadamer a little more than a decade ago and then Paul Ricoeur not long after. Of course, this question was also made all the more resonant with the death of their contemporary, Jacques Derrida, who was not only of incomparable importance in his own right but also an irreplaceable interlocutor for Gadamer and, in turn, a touchstone for so many others associated with hermeneutics. What, it may be asked, are the prospects for hermeneutics now that these figures are gone? Does the future of hermeneutics belong first of all to the Buchstabenphilosoph , the philosopher of the letter, who would abstract from history by the aim simply to identify, clarify, and adjudicate theses about the purported positions of these now departed forebearers? Or, on the contrary, does the future of hermeneutics instead hold new possibilities that both develop further and even expand beyond the letter of the achievements of their predecessors? Fortunately, the philosophical study of hermeneutics has seen several recent contributions

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Mar 26, 2014

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