Introduction

Introduction Transition to Adulthood in East Asia Along with the significant economic recession in East Asia during the last two decades, often described as the “lost decade” in Japan and “economic crisis” in South Korea, East Asian societies have seen rapidly rising economic inequality and job insecurity (Brinton, 2011; Shin, 2013). Although the impacts of economic and social changes in the region are overarching across different dimensions of societies, particularly notable are their influences on the pathways of adulthood. Young adults in the region have increasingly delayed their transition to adulthood by staying longer in school, experiencing difficulty in attaining a stable job and marrying later (or, even increasingly, remaining single), which also likely have affected leaving the parental home (Brinton, 2011; Newman, 2008; Yeung and Alipio, 2013). Importantly, the transition to adulthood in the region is not only taking longer, but is also taking place in much less standardised way than in the past. For instance, co-habitation before marriage has increasingly appealed to Japanese young adults, although co-habitation is still much less prevalent than among young adults in the West and it has different meanings and consequences (Raymo et al., 2009). What does it mean to East Asian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Journal of Social Science Brill

Introduction


Transition to Adulthood in East Asia Along with the significant economic recession in East Asia during the last two decades, often described as the “lost decade” in Japan and “economic crisis” in South Korea, East Asian societies have seen rapidly rising economic inequality and job insecurity (Brinton, 2011; Shin, 2013). Although the impacts of economic and social changes in the region are overarching across different dimensions of societies, particularly notable are their influences on the pathways of adulthood. Young adults in the region have increasingly delayed their transition to adulthood by staying longer in school, experiencing difficulty in attaining a stable job and marrying later (or, even increasingly, remaining single), which also likely have affected leaving the parental home (Brinton, 2011; Newman, 2008; Yeung and Alipio, 2013). Importantly, the transition to adulthood in the region is not only taking longer, but is also taking place in much less standardised way than in the past. For instance, co-habitation before marriage has increasingly appealed to Japanese young adults, although co-habitation is still much less prevalent than among young adults in the West and it has different meanings and consequences (Raymo et al., 2009). What does it mean to East Asian young adults to “become an adult” in these rapidly changing contexts? When do they feel they have become an adult? What are the major criteria with which young people in East Asia define adulthood? Do traditional markers such as full-time job, marriage and parenthood still matter for them to perceive themselves as adults? How do they navigate new educational and economic environments that increasingly pose challenges for them to make smooth transitions? To what extent are the patterns of transition to adulthood that East Asian young adults display distinctive (or similar) from what scholars of Western societies have found among their young adults? What do...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/introduction-QZyLFFRB1y
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2016 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
ISSN
1568-4849
eISSN
1568-5314
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685314-04403002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Transition to Adulthood in East Asia Along with the significant economic recession in East Asia during the last two decades, often described as the “lost decade” in Japan and “economic crisis” in South Korea, East Asian societies have seen rapidly rising economic inequality and job insecurity (Brinton, 2011; Shin, 2013). Although the impacts of economic and social changes in the region are overarching across different dimensions of societies, particularly notable are their influences on the pathways of adulthood. Young adults in the region have increasingly delayed their transition to adulthood by staying longer in school, experiencing difficulty in attaining a stable job and marrying later (or, even increasingly, remaining single), which also likely have affected leaving the parental home (Brinton, 2011; Newman, 2008; Yeung and Alipio, 2013). Importantly, the transition to adulthood in the region is not only taking longer, but is also taking place in much less standardised way than in the past. For instance, co-habitation before marriage has increasingly appealed to Japanese young adults, although co-habitation is still much less prevalent than among young adults in the West and it has different meanings and consequences (Raymo et al., 2009). What does it mean to East Asian

Journal

Asian Journal of Social ScienceBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off