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Introduction

Introduction This issue of Inner Asia has a strong focus on Inner Asian history in the Qing period. Three articles present detailed research on diverse, and in many ways complementary, aspects of the Qing realm. Two further papers move forward in time, to the early twentieth-century period in Tibet and to the twenty-first century of Kalmykia, Russia. We are delighted that so many of the authors for this issue are scholars from the region, and that all of the articles advance knowledge by presenting perspectives that reflect or describe Inner Asian cultural understandings.Khohchahar Chuluu opens the issue with a study of the military hunt in Qing Inner Mongolia. It is well known that hunting in this period was not only a local practice aimed to obtain meat and kill harmful wild animals such as wolves; it could also take the form of a large-scale collective enterprise that was intended as a training for military campaigns. In fact, such hunts had had this purpose since the Mongol Empire. The circular hunt formation, consisting of a wide chain of regularly spaced, mounted hunters divided into right and left wings that closed in on large numbers of animals, was spread throughout the Qing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

Introduction

Inner Asia , Volume 20 (1): 4 – Apr 16, 2018

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/22105018-12340096
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This issue of Inner Asia has a strong focus on Inner Asian history in the Qing period. Three articles present detailed research on diverse, and in many ways complementary, aspects of the Qing realm. Two further papers move forward in time, to the early twentieth-century period in Tibet and to the twenty-first century of Kalmykia, Russia. We are delighted that so many of the authors for this issue are scholars from the region, and that all of the articles advance knowledge by presenting perspectives that reflect or describe Inner Asian cultural understandings.Khohchahar Chuluu opens the issue with a study of the military hunt in Qing Inner Mongolia. It is well known that hunting in this period was not only a local practice aimed to obtain meat and kill harmful wild animals such as wolves; it could also take the form of a large-scale collective enterprise that was intended as a training for military campaigns. In fact, such hunts had had this purpose since the Mongol Empire. The circular hunt formation, consisting of a wide chain of regularly spaced, mounted hunters divided into right and left wings that closed in on large numbers of animals, was spread throughout the Qing

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Apr 16, 2018

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