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Interview with

Interview with Middle East Law and Governance 3 (2011) 230­237 brill.nl/melg Dr. Lilia Labidi Minister of Women's Affairs Government of Tunisia [The Editors are pleased to feature an interview with Mme. Lilia Labidi, a professor of psychology and anthropology at the University of Tunis, who has written extensively on women in the Arab world. As of January 17, 2011, Mme. Labidi was appointed as Minister of Women's Affairs for the Government of Tunisia. The Editors directed their questions to Minister Labidi in Tunis.] Editors: What was the role of women in the revolution? How did women participate and lead, and were the roles of male and female activists similar or different ­ if the latter, how so? Labidi: Among the various characterizations of the Tunisian Revolution there is consensus that it began in the poorest regions of Tunisia, that it was spontaneous, carried out by the peaceful apolitical youth without associations to political leaders. Women were present during the very first demonstrations. Some were young, others older, some were unemployed, others employed, a number had artistic professions, and they were numerous in the streets of cities ­ like Kasserine, Sidi Bouzid, Thala ­ as well as in the capital Tunis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Middle East Law and Governance Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1876-3367
eISSN
1876-3375
DOI
10.1163/187633711X591576
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Middle East Law and Governance 3 (2011) 230­237 brill.nl/melg Dr. Lilia Labidi Minister of Women's Affairs Government of Tunisia [The Editors are pleased to feature an interview with Mme. Lilia Labidi, a professor of psychology and anthropology at the University of Tunis, who has written extensively on women in the Arab world. As of January 17, 2011, Mme. Labidi was appointed as Minister of Women's Affairs for the Government of Tunisia. The Editors directed their questions to Minister Labidi in Tunis.] Editors: What was the role of women in the revolution? How did women participate and lead, and were the roles of male and female activists similar or different ­ if the latter, how so? Labidi: Among the various characterizations of the Tunisian Revolution there is consensus that it began in the poorest regions of Tunisia, that it was spontaneous, carried out by the peaceful apolitical youth without associations to political leaders. Women were present during the very first demonstrations. Some were young, others older, some were unemployed, others employed, a number had artistic professions, and they were numerous in the streets of cities ­ like Kasserine, Sidi Bouzid, Thala ­ as well as in the capital Tunis.

Journal

Middle East Law and GovernanceBrill

Published: Mar 25, 2011

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