Interspecific cross-fostering affects mate guarding behaviour in great tits (Parus major)

Interspecific cross-fostering affects mate guarding behaviour in great tits (Parus major) Interspecific cross-fostering affects mate guarding behaviour in great tits ( Parus major ) Bo Terning Hansen 1) , Lars Erik Johannessen & Tore Slagsvold (University of Oslo, Department of Biology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), P.O. Box 1066, N-0316 Oslo, Norway) (Accepted: 22 February 2009) Summary Mate guarding is thought to decrease the likelihood of cuckoldry and, hence, increase the fitness of guarding males. Mate guarding is costly for males and must be traded off with other fitness-enhancing behaviours. Over several years, we have cross-fostered great tits ( Parus major ) to blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus ) and this experimental treatment has influenced the mate and rival recognition of cross-fostered birds. Here we show that cross-fostered great tit males mate guard their females less than do control great tits, regardless of whether the cross-fostered males were mated to great tit females or cross-fostered blue tit females. Cross- fostered great tit males sang more and interacted more frequently with blue tit males than did controls. Females paired to males of the two groups did not differ in the extent to which they initiated movements away from their mates. We conclude that the altered species-assortative behaviour resulting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Interspecific cross-fostering affects mate guarding behaviour in great tits (Parus major)

Behaviour, Volume 146 (10): 1349 – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853909X427713
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Interspecific cross-fostering affects mate guarding behaviour in great tits ( Parus major ) Bo Terning Hansen 1) , Lars Erik Johannessen & Tore Slagsvold (University of Oslo, Department of Biology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), P.O. Box 1066, N-0316 Oslo, Norway) (Accepted: 22 February 2009) Summary Mate guarding is thought to decrease the likelihood of cuckoldry and, hence, increase the fitness of guarding males. Mate guarding is costly for males and must be traded off with other fitness-enhancing behaviours. Over several years, we have cross-fostered great tits ( Parus major ) to blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus ) and this experimental treatment has influenced the mate and rival recognition of cross-fostered birds. Here we show that cross-fostered great tit males mate guard their females less than do control great tits, regardless of whether the cross-fostered males were mated to great tit females or cross-fostered blue tit females. Cross- fostered great tit males sang more and interacted more frequently with blue tit males than did controls. Females paired to males of the two groups did not differ in the extent to which they initiated movements away from their mates. We conclude that the altered species-assortative behaviour resulting

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: MATE GUARDING; CROSS-FOSTERING; MATE QUALITY; PARUS MAJOR; TERRITORIALITY; SEXUAL IMPRINTING

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