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Interpretation, Dialogue, and Friendship: On the Remainder of C ommunity

Interpretation, Dialogue, and Friendship: On the Remainder of C ommunity 54 Interpretation, Dialogue, and Friendship: On the Remainder of C ommunity STEPHEN H. WATSON University of Notre Dame I The concept of tradition has a long and overdetermined history in the descent of Western thought, articulated first in classical thought from Socrates to Lucretius as a sacred past with which philosophy must rup- ture in order to gain access to its truth-an account framed, that is, in the "ancient quarrel" between X6yog and Jlû80ç itself. The medievals' refiguration of philosophy perhaps only apparently broke with these contraints, albeit by attempting, beginning with Irenaeus and Tertullian, to revalorize the notion of traditio, of the 1tapáo'U(JÍ,ç, by rational war- rant. The result was a formalized notion of the ordo traditio itself, safe- guarding what must be remembered as true and handed down from generation to generation: preserving it, that is, from false interpreta- tions or heresy. It would be naive however to think that either the concept of tradi- tion or the sacred past it articulates simply disappear from philosophi- cal modernism-any more than, as Claude Lefort has decisively shown, the religious simply disappears from modern conceptions of the politi- cal.' Notwithstanding modernist outcries against what Hobbes, for ex- ample, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Interpretation, Dialogue, and Friendship: On the Remainder of C ommunity

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 26 (1): 54 – Jan 1, 1996

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1996 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916496X00049
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

54 Interpretation, Dialogue, and Friendship: On the Remainder of C ommunity STEPHEN H. WATSON University of Notre Dame I The concept of tradition has a long and overdetermined history in the descent of Western thought, articulated first in classical thought from Socrates to Lucretius as a sacred past with which philosophy must rup- ture in order to gain access to its truth-an account framed, that is, in the "ancient quarrel" between X6yog and Jlû80ç itself. The medievals' refiguration of philosophy perhaps only apparently broke with these contraints, albeit by attempting, beginning with Irenaeus and Tertullian, to revalorize the notion of traditio, of the 1tapáo'U(JÍ,ç, by rational war- rant. The result was a formalized notion of the ordo traditio itself, safe- guarding what must be remembered as true and handed down from generation to generation: preserving it, that is, from false interpreta- tions or heresy. It would be naive however to think that either the concept of tradi- tion or the sacred past it articulates simply disappear from philosophi- cal modernism-any more than, as Claude Lefort has decisively shown, the religious simply disappears from modern conceptions of the politi- cal.' Notwithstanding modernist outcries against what Hobbes, for ex- ample,

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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