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Interpretation and the Structure of Space in Scientific Theory and in Perception

Interpretation and the Structure of Space in Scientific Theory and in Perception 187 Interpretation and the Structure of Space in Scientific Theory and in Perception.* PATRICK A. HEELAN State University of New York at Stony Brook Introduction: Edward Ballard's Principles of Interpretation provides an excellent general background to the phenomenological and hermeneuti- cal aspect of all understanding, whether of nature, self, or others. As such it provides an excellent starting point for the consideration of special areas of human inquiry. I shall comment in these remarks on certain aspects of Ballard's analysis of perception, especially space- perception, and on the consequences of this for an understanding of the phenomenology of the natural sciences. The conclusions I shall come to will challenge traditional phenomenological views, shared by Ballard, about these sciences. 1. It is, alas! generally forgotten that the phenomenological critique of science deriving from Edmund Husserl's Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology contains a positive as well as a negative part. As a consequence, phenomenology today is unfortunately ste- reotyped by its attacks on 'objective' science rather than by its potential contributions to a better 'essential' understanding of the scientific enterprise. It should be noted that the negative critique of science is the critique of certain historically and culturally http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Interpretation and the Structure of Space in Scientific Theory and in Perception

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 16 (1): 187 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916486X00121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

187 Interpretation and the Structure of Space in Scientific Theory and in Perception.* PATRICK A. HEELAN State University of New York at Stony Brook Introduction: Edward Ballard's Principles of Interpretation provides an excellent general background to the phenomenological and hermeneuti- cal aspect of all understanding, whether of nature, self, or others. As such it provides an excellent starting point for the consideration of special areas of human inquiry. I shall comment in these remarks on certain aspects of Ballard's analysis of perception, especially space- perception, and on the consequences of this for an understanding of the phenomenology of the natural sciences. The conclusions I shall come to will challenge traditional phenomenological views, shared by Ballard, about these sciences. 1. It is, alas! generally forgotten that the phenomenological critique of science deriving from Edmund Husserl's Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology contains a positive as well as a negative part. As a consequence, phenomenology today is unfortunately ste- reotyped by its attacks on 'objective' science rather than by its potential contributions to a better 'essential' understanding of the scientific enterprise. It should be noted that the negative critique of science is the critique of certain historically and culturally

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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