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Inter- and Intra-Ethnic Relations and Power Sharing in Post-Conflict Iraq

Inter- and Intra-Ethnic Relations and Power Sharing in Post-Conflict Iraq Renad Mansour and Faleh Jabar* I. Introduction The US-led invasion of Iraq, now marking its ten-year anniversary, turned the 1921 British-built centralised unitary state model, embedded in market economy with special rights to Kurds, Christians, and Jews, upside down. It attempted to reconstruct a market-embedded democracy within a federal decentralised and consociational order, under violent political conditions, and a full-fledged rentier economy with strong command features. Following the US withdrawal in 2011, the Shi'i Islamic political elite under Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki unleashed a poorly calculated drive to reinstall a version of the old unitary central model, which runs counter to the federal and decentralised constitutional and institutional structure of the political system, triggering thereby multiple centres of confrontation not only against Sunni groups, or Kurds, but also against two Shi'i blocks. This is the main source of the political crisis engulfing Iraq and overshadowing future inter- and intra-ethnic and communal relations. By dint of central control over oil revenues, the hegemonic drive managed to hold a tight grip over the army and the bureaucracy, subsume the judiciary, and bring the autonomy of independent commissions to an end. In this attempt, both sectarian and ethnic discourses and motifs http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Inter- and Intra-Ethnic Relations and Power Sharing in Post-Conflict Iraq

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90110044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Renad Mansour and Faleh Jabar* I. Introduction The US-led invasion of Iraq, now marking its ten-year anniversary, turned the 1921 British-built centralised unitary state model, embedded in market economy with special rights to Kurds, Christians, and Jews, upside down. It attempted to reconstruct a market-embedded democracy within a federal decentralised and consociational order, under violent political conditions, and a full-fledged rentier economy with strong command features. Following the US withdrawal in 2011, the Shi'i Islamic political elite under Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki unleashed a poorly calculated drive to reinstall a version of the old unitary central model, which runs counter to the federal and decentralised constitutional and institutional structure of the political system, triggering thereby multiple centres of confrontation not only against Sunni groups, or Kurds, but also against two Shi'i blocks. This is the main source of the political crisis engulfing Iraq and overshadowing future inter- and intra-ethnic and communal relations. By dint of central control over oil revenues, the hegemonic drive managed to hold a tight grip over the army and the bureaucracy, subsume the judiciary, and bring the autonomy of independent commissions to an end. In this attempt, both sectarian and ethnic discourses and motifs

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Nov 17, 2014

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