Intentionality, Morality, and Their Relationship in Human Judgment

Intentionality, Morality, and Their Relationship in Human Judgment Intentionality, Morality, and Their Relationship in Human Judgment B  F. M  * ABSTRACT This article explores several entanglements between human judgments of intentionality and morality (blame and praise). After proposing a model of people’s folk concept of intentionality I discuss three topics. First, considerations of a behavior’s intentionality a ff ect people’s praise and blame of that behavior, but one study suggests that there may be an asymmetry such that blame is more a ff ected than praise. Second, the concept of intentionality is constitutive of many legal judgments (e.g., of murder vs. manslaughter), and one study illustrates people’s subtle considerations of intentionality in making those judgments. Third, controversial recent studies suggest that moral considerations can a ff ect judgments of intentionality, and an asymmetry may exist such that blame a ff ects those judgments more than praise. I report two new studies that may shed light on these recent fi ndings, and I discuss several theoretical models that might account for the impact of moral considerations on intentionality judgments and for the relationship between the two more generally. KEYWORDS Theory of mind, moral psychology, psychology and law, social cognition, attribution In this article I explore http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognition and Culture Brill

Intentionality, Morality, and Their Relationship in Human Judgment

Journal of Cognition and Culture, Volume 6 (1-2): 87 – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1567-7095
eISSN
1568-5373
DOI
10.1163/156853706776931358
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Intentionality, Morality, and Their Relationship in Human Judgment B  F. M  * ABSTRACT This article explores several entanglements between human judgments of intentionality and morality (blame and praise). After proposing a model of people’s folk concept of intentionality I discuss three topics. First, considerations of a behavior’s intentionality a ff ect people’s praise and blame of that behavior, but one study suggests that there may be an asymmetry such that blame is more a ff ected than praise. Second, the concept of intentionality is constitutive of many legal judgments (e.g., of murder vs. manslaughter), and one study illustrates people’s subtle considerations of intentionality in making those judgments. Third, controversial recent studies suggest that moral considerations can a ff ect judgments of intentionality, and an asymmetry may exist such that blame a ff ects those judgments more than praise. I report two new studies that may shed light on these recent fi ndings, and I discuss several theoretical models that might account for the impact of moral considerations on intentionality judgments and for the relationship between the two more generally. KEYWORDS Theory of mind, moral psychology, psychology and law, social cognition, attribution In this article I explore

Journal

Journal of Cognition and CultureBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

Keywords: PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW; THEORY OF MIND; MORAL PSYCHOLOGY; SOCIAL COGNITION; ATTRIBUTION

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