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Intentionality in General

Intentionality in General 7 Intentionality in General ROBERT JORDAN Weighing the topic of this symposium, I have come to hope that Dorion Cairns's contribution to phenomenology has not yet arrived, not fully arrived in any event. To date, the effects of Cairns's work, so far as they are observable, are by no means commensurate with what his contribution might and should be. A direct impact of his thought on the phenomeno- logical movement as a whole is discernable only in a few of his closer students. The course of phenomenology in North America during the 1950's and most of the 1960's was a disoriented, meandering sort of movement, accompanied by nervous ticks and, all to often, meaningless babble: something Cairns's students could not witness without a sense of frustration over his relative silence. Those who were familiar with them saw that Cairns's acuteness, accuracy, precision and his sense of direction, his accord with the spirit of phenomenology as a strict science, were precisely what the movement lacked. It is still somewhat impoverished in respect of this need, not quite moderately well off. Cairns's contribution- as I said before-has, I hope, yet to arrive. So what I shall speak to here is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Intentionality in General

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 4 (1): 7 – Jan 1, 1974

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1974 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916474X00025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

7 Intentionality in General ROBERT JORDAN Weighing the topic of this symposium, I have come to hope that Dorion Cairns's contribution to phenomenology has not yet arrived, not fully arrived in any event. To date, the effects of Cairns's work, so far as they are observable, are by no means commensurate with what his contribution might and should be. A direct impact of his thought on the phenomeno- logical movement as a whole is discernable only in a few of his closer students. The course of phenomenology in North America during the 1950's and most of the 1960's was a disoriented, meandering sort of movement, accompanied by nervous ticks and, all to often, meaningless babble: something Cairns's students could not witness without a sense of frustration over his relative silence. Those who were familiar with them saw that Cairns's acuteness, accuracy, precision and his sense of direction, his accord with the spirit of phenomenology as a strict science, were precisely what the movement lacked. It is still somewhat impoverished in respect of this need, not quite moderately well off. Cairns's contribution- as I said before-has, I hope, yet to arrive. So what I shall speak to here is

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1974

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