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Institutions, Ethno-nationalism, and Sense of Belonging: Comparing Separatist Tendencies in Catalonia and South Tyrol

Institutions, Ethno-nationalism, and Sense of Belonging: Comparing Separatist Tendencies in... Andrea Carlà* I. Introduction In recent years, Catalonia, one of the autonomous communities of Spain,¹ has been featured in the news due to its separatist claims and efforts to gain political independence from Madrid. The current economic crisis has further revived ethnonational tensions in the territory. In September 2012, more than one million people protested in Barcelona for the right of self-determination of Catalonia from Madrid.² Then, after a failed attempt to modify fiscal arrangements between Madrid and Catalonia that would have allowed the latter to keep more taxes collected locally, elections were held in the autonomous community in which parties advocating for independence won the majority. The new Catalan government is planning to hold a referendum on the subject of self-determination in 2014.³ According to a June 2012 survey, an estimated 51% of Catalans will vote for independence in a referendum and only 21% will vote against.4 However, even before the deterioration of the Spanish economic situation, separatist and independence claims in Catalonia were widely prevalent in society and invoked at various times by Catalan political forces. In 2009, before the economic crisis deepened, the village of Arenys de Munt, followed by other 166 * Dr. Andrea http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Institutions, Ethno-nationalism, and Sense of Belonging: Comparing Separatist Tendencies in Catalonia and South Tyrol

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 11 (1): 91 – Nov 17, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90110040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Andrea Carlà* I. Introduction In recent years, Catalonia, one of the autonomous communities of Spain,¹ has been featured in the news due to its separatist claims and efforts to gain political independence from Madrid. The current economic crisis has further revived ethnonational tensions in the territory. In September 2012, more than one million people protested in Barcelona for the right of self-determination of Catalonia from Madrid.² Then, after a failed attempt to modify fiscal arrangements between Madrid and Catalonia that would have allowed the latter to keep more taxes collected locally, elections were held in the autonomous community in which parties advocating for independence won the majority. The new Catalan government is planning to hold a referendum on the subject of self-determination in 2014.³ According to a June 2012 survey, an estimated 51% of Catalans will vote for independence in a referendum and only 21% will vote against.4 However, even before the deterioration of the Spanish economic situation, separatist and independence claims in Catalonia were widely prevalent in society and invoked at various times by Catalan political forces. In 2009, before the economic crisis deepened, the village of Arenys de Munt, followed by other 166 * Dr. Andrea

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Nov 17, 2014

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