Inflammation due to toe-clipping in natterjack toads (Bufo calamita)

Inflammation due to toe-clipping in natterjack toads (Bufo calamita) Short Notes Inflammation due to toe-clipping in natterjack toads (Bufo calamita) Nils Golay, Heinz Durrer Station de recherche RANA, Rue de la Pisciculture, 68300 St. Louis, France Since toe-clipping for amphibians was introduced by Bogert (for Bufo terrestris) in 1947, numerous scientists have used this method for the recognition of individual amphibians if they are observed for long time periods, and especially for more than one season. After Heusser's experience (1958) in amputating the phalanges of 1500 common toads (Bufo bufo), very few workers have amputated the first three fingers of males (important for amplexus) or the long fourth toe of the hind legs of both sexes (important for moulting). Toe-clipping has also been the most commonly chosen method for recognition in natterjack toads (e.g. Boomsma and Arntzen, 1985; Flindt and Hemmer, 1967, 1968; Heusser and Meisterhans, 1969; Niekisch, 1982; Schwabe, 1977; Sinsch, 1988, 1992a, 1992b; Tejedo, 1988). However, evaluation of possible increased morbidity or mortality has only rarely been carried out. Clarke (1972) published a study concerning this topic in Bufo woodhousei fowleri. He found a dramatically increased mortality due to toe amputations. Underhill (cited by Honegger, 1979) noticed a loss of weight in Rana pipiens after http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Inflammation due to toe-clipping in natterjack toads (Bufo calamita)

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 15 (1): 81 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1994 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
DOI
10.1163/156853894X00560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short Notes Inflammation due to toe-clipping in natterjack toads (Bufo calamita) Nils Golay, Heinz Durrer Station de recherche RANA, Rue de la Pisciculture, 68300 St. Louis, France Since toe-clipping for amphibians was introduced by Bogert (for Bufo terrestris) in 1947, numerous scientists have used this method for the recognition of individual amphibians if they are observed for long time periods, and especially for more than one season. After Heusser's experience (1958) in amputating the phalanges of 1500 common toads (Bufo bufo), very few workers have amputated the first three fingers of males (important for amplexus) or the long fourth toe of the hind legs of both sexes (important for moulting). Toe-clipping has also been the most commonly chosen method for recognition in natterjack toads (e.g. Boomsma and Arntzen, 1985; Flindt and Hemmer, 1967, 1968; Heusser and Meisterhans, 1969; Niekisch, 1982; Schwabe, 1977; Sinsch, 1988, 1992a, 1992b; Tejedo, 1988). However, evaluation of possible increased morbidity or mortality has only rarely been carried out. Clarke (1972) published a study concerning this topic in Bufo woodhousei fowleri. He found a dramatically increased mortality due to toe amputations. Underhill (cited by Honegger, 1979) noticed a loss of weight in Rana pipiens after

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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