Inbreeding depression affects fertilization success and survival but not breeding coloration in threespine sticklebacks

Inbreeding depression affects fertilization success and survival but not breeding coloration in... Inbreeding depression affects fertilization success and survival but not breeding coloration in threespine sticklebacks Joachim G. Frommen 1,3) , Corinna Luz 1) , Dominique Mazzi 2,4) & Theo C.M. Bakker 1,2) ( 1 Institute for Evolutionary Biology and Ecology, University of Bonn, An der Immenburg 1, D-53121 Bonn, Germany; 2 Abt. Verhaltensökologie, Zoologisches Institut, University of Bern, Wohlenstrasse 50a, CH-3032 Hinterkappelen, Switzerland) (Accepted: 26 December 2007) Summary Inbreeding depression is a well-studied phenomenon which has been demonstrated in many animal and plant species. In fishes, most studies focus on species of commercial interest. Sticklebacks often colonize new habitats by starting with a small founder population which, thus, suffers a high risk of inbreeding. However, little is known about the degree of inbreed- ing depression of sticklebacks’ life-history traits like fertilization success or hatching and survival rate. Furthermore, there is a general lack of knowledge about the impact of inbreed- ing on sexually selected traits like males’ breeding coloration. In our study, one generation of inbreeding by brother–sister mating of wild-caught, anadromous sticklebacks significantly lowered the fertilization and hatching success of eggs. This effect was intensified by a second generation of inbreeding. Furthermore, fewer inbred individuals reached and survived http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Inbreeding depression affects fertilization success and survival but not breeding coloration in threespine sticklebacks

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853908792451458
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inbreeding depression affects fertilization success and survival but not breeding coloration in threespine sticklebacks Joachim G. Frommen 1,3) , Corinna Luz 1) , Dominique Mazzi 2,4) & Theo C.M. Bakker 1,2) ( 1 Institute for Evolutionary Biology and Ecology, University of Bonn, An der Immenburg 1, D-53121 Bonn, Germany; 2 Abt. Verhaltensökologie, Zoologisches Institut, University of Bern, Wohlenstrasse 50a, CH-3032 Hinterkappelen, Switzerland) (Accepted: 26 December 2007) Summary Inbreeding depression is a well-studied phenomenon which has been demonstrated in many animal and plant species. In fishes, most studies focus on species of commercial interest. Sticklebacks often colonize new habitats by starting with a small founder population which, thus, suffers a high risk of inbreeding. However, little is known about the degree of inbreed- ing depression of sticklebacks’ life-history traits like fertilization success or hatching and survival rate. Furthermore, there is a general lack of knowledge about the impact of inbreed- ing on sexually selected traits like males’ breeding coloration. In our study, one generation of inbreeding by brother–sister mating of wild-caught, anadromous sticklebacks significantly lowered the fertilization and hatching success of eggs. This effect was intensified by a second generation of inbreeding. Furthermore, fewer inbred individuals reached and survived

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: FISH; HATCHING RATE; SEXUAL SELECTION; INBREEDING DEPRESSION; HETEROZYGOSITY; BREEDING COLORATION; GASTEROSTEUS ACULEATUS; POPULATION SIZE

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