Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

In Sudan’s Eastern Borderland: Frontier Societies of the Qwara Region (ca. ad 600-1850)

In Sudan’s Eastern Borderland: Frontier Societies of the Qwara Region (ca. ad 600-1850) AbstractThe Sudanese-Ethiopian borderland has seen interaction between state and non-state peoples for at least two millennia. However, little is known about these interactions from an archaeological point of view. Our research project intends to cast light on this topic by looking at the lowlands of nw Ethiopia. Surveys conducted during three field seasons in the Metema and Qwara regions – in the Atbara-Dinder watershed – have allowed us to document different cultural traditions that are related to Sudan in medieval and post-medieval times. Here, we present the data and discuss the relevance of the findings to understand border dynamics from the mid-first millennium ad onwards. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

In Sudan’s Eastern Borderland: Frontier Societies of the Qwara Region (ca. ad 600-1850)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/in-sudan-s-eastern-borderland-frontier-societies-of-the-qwara-region-jJ32xAcOzM
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.1163/21915784-12340011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe Sudanese-Ethiopian borderland has seen interaction between state and non-state peoples for at least two millennia. However, little is known about these interactions from an archaeological point of view. Our research project intends to cast light on this topic by looking at the lowlands of nw Ethiopia. Surveys conducted during three field seasons in the Metema and Qwara regions – in the Atbara-Dinder watershed – have allowed us to document different cultural traditions that are related to Sudan in medieval and post-medieval times. Here, we present the data and discuss the relevance of the findings to understand border dynamics from the mid-first millennium ad onwards.

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Feb 14, 2017

References