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Image and Phenomenon

Image and Phenomenon 61 Image and Phenomenon* JOHN SALLIS Duquesne University Phenomenological thinking is the practice of self-effacement in the face of the matters themselves. The rigor thus required of such thinking must be such as to allow it to stand under the demand to attend solely to the matters as they present themselves. Phenomenological thinking is directed toward evidence, that is, toward experiences in which the matters at issue "are present to me as 'they themselves,' " and it places itself under the demand that what it presents as scientific judgment be grounded in evidence so understood.' This demand for evidence constitutes what Husserl calls the principle of all principles: "that whatever presents itself originarily to us in 'intuition' (as it were, in its bodily actuality) is simply to be accepted as that as which it gives itself but only within the limits in which it there gives itself."2 Phenomenology means: AEyeev rå wazv6yeva : phenomenology lets "that which shows itself be seen from itself as it shows itself from itself."3 Phenomenological thinking would "leave the last word to the matters themselves."' *Preparation of this study was made possible by a Stipendium awarded by the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung. ' Edmund http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Image and Phenomenon

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 5 (1): 61 – Jan 1, 1975

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1975 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916475X00105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

61 Image and Phenomenon* JOHN SALLIS Duquesne University Phenomenological thinking is the practice of self-effacement in the face of the matters themselves. The rigor thus required of such thinking must be such as to allow it to stand under the demand to attend solely to the matters as they present themselves. Phenomenological thinking is directed toward evidence, that is, toward experiences in which the matters at issue "are present to me as 'they themselves,' " and it places itself under the demand that what it presents as scientific judgment be grounded in evidence so understood.' This demand for evidence constitutes what Husserl calls the principle of all principles: "that whatever presents itself originarily to us in 'intuition' (as it were, in its bodily actuality) is simply to be accepted as that as which it gives itself but only within the limits in which it there gives itself."2 Phenomenology means: AEyeev rå wazv6yeva : phenomenology lets "that which shows itself be seen from itself as it shows itself from itself."3 Phenomenological thinking would "leave the last word to the matters themselves."' *Preparation of this study was made possible by a Stipendium awarded by the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung. ' Edmund

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1975

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