Identifying effects of toe clipping on anuran return rates: the importance of statistical power

Identifying effects of toe clipping on anuran return rates: the importance of statistical power Identifying effects of toe clipping on anuran return rates: the importance of statistical power Kirsten M. Parris 1,3 , Michael A. McCarthy 2,3 1 Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne, c/o School of Botany, University of Melbourne VIC 3010, Australia e-mail: k.parris@botany.unimelb.edu.au 2 School of Botany, University of Melbourne VIC 3010, Australia 3 National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California Santa Barbara, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101, USA e-mail: m.mccarthy@botany.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. Toe clipping is a common method of marking anurans for population studies. We re-analysed data from four published studies investigating the relationship between return rate and number of toes clipped for three anuran species: Bufo fowleri , Crinia signifera and Hyla labialis . Although these studies claimed contradictory results, a re-analysis of the data with proper attention to statistical power demonstrated a statistically signiŽ cant decline of 6-18% in the probability of return for each toe removed after the Ž rst, in three of the four studies examined. The probability that the fourth study would detect a statistically signiŽ cant effect of toe clipping was low unless the size of the effect was overwhelming. These results provide consistent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Identifying effects of toe clipping on anuran return rates: the importance of statistical power

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 22 (3): 275 – Jan 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/identifying-effects-of-toe-clipping-on-anuran-return-rates-the-RVb0Y0GCLM
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
DOI
10.1163/156853801317050070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Identifying effects of toe clipping on anuran return rates: the importance of statistical power Kirsten M. Parris 1,3 , Michael A. McCarthy 2,3 1 Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne, c/o School of Botany, University of Melbourne VIC 3010, Australia e-mail: k.parris@botany.unimelb.edu.au 2 School of Botany, University of Melbourne VIC 3010, Australia 3 National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, University of California Santa Barbara, 735 State Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101, USA e-mail: m.mccarthy@botany.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. Toe clipping is a common method of marking anurans for population studies. We re-analysed data from four published studies investigating the relationship between return rate and number of toes clipped for three anuran species: Bufo fowleri , Crinia signifera and Hyla labialis . Although these studies claimed contradictory results, a re-analysis of the data with proper attention to statistical power demonstrated a statistically signiŽ cant decline of 6-18% in the probability of return for each toe removed after the Ž rst, in three of the four studies examined. The probability that the fourth study would detect a statistically signiŽ cant effect of toe clipping was low unless the size of the effect was overwhelming. These results provide consistent

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off