Identification of Early Larvae of New Zealand Spiny and Shovel-Nosed Lobsters (Decapoda, Palinuridae and Scyllaridae)

Identification of Early Larvae of New Zealand Spiny and Shovel-Nosed Lobsters (Decapoda,... IDENTIFICATION OF EARLY LARVAE OF NEW ZEALAND SPINY AND SHOVEL-NOSED LOBSTERS (DECAPODA, PALINURIDAE AND SCYLLARIDAE) BY J. H. R. LESSER Fisheries Research Division, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Wellington, New Zealand INTRODUCTION Phyllosoma larvae captured in the plankton may be assembled into develop- mental series readily enough on the grounds of similar morphology, but may remain unidentified on the specific or even generic level, owing to the extensive change in body form at metamorphosis from phyllosoma larva to the post-phyllo- soma forms, e.g., Gurney (1936) and Prasad & Tampi (1957). The identity of a larval series may be guessed by consideration of the geographical distribution of larvae and adults, e.g., Gurney (1936), Prasad & Tampi (1959), Johnson (1970), and Robertson (1969b). Positive identification can really be proved only by either rearing the earliest stages from an adult female of known species, e.g., Gilchrist (1916), George (1962), and Robertson (1968), or by maintaining the last stage through metamorphosis to the post-phyllosoma form, e.g., Dotsu, Tanaka, Shojima & Seno (1966). Phyllosoma larvae of las1IJ and the shovel-nosed lobsters of the family Scyl- laridae share the distinctive character of lacking a setose exopod on the third maxilliped. Gurney (1936) suggested that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

Identification of Early Larvae of New Zealand Spiny and Shovel-Nosed Lobsters (Decapoda, Palinuridae and Scyllaridae)

Crustaceana , Volume 27 (3): 259 – Jan 1, 1974

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1974 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854074X00794
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IDENTIFICATION OF EARLY LARVAE OF NEW ZEALAND SPINY AND SHOVEL-NOSED LOBSTERS (DECAPODA, PALINURIDAE AND SCYLLARIDAE) BY J. H. R. LESSER Fisheries Research Division, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Wellington, New Zealand INTRODUCTION Phyllosoma larvae captured in the plankton may be assembled into develop- mental series readily enough on the grounds of similar morphology, but may remain unidentified on the specific or even generic level, owing to the extensive change in body form at metamorphosis from phyllosoma larva to the post-phyllo- soma forms, e.g., Gurney (1936) and Prasad & Tampi (1957). The identity of a larval series may be guessed by consideration of the geographical distribution of larvae and adults, e.g., Gurney (1936), Prasad & Tampi (1959), Johnson (1970), and Robertson (1969b). Positive identification can really be proved only by either rearing the earliest stages from an adult female of known species, e.g., Gilchrist (1916), George (1962), and Robertson (1968), or by maintaining the last stage through metamorphosis to the post-phyllosoma form, e.g., Dotsu, Tanaka, Shojima & Seno (1966). Phyllosoma larvae of las1IJ and the shovel-nosed lobsters of the family Scyl- laridae share the distinctive character of lacking a setose exopod on the third maxilliped. Gurney (1936) suggested that

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1974

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