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Ian Bremmer (2012). Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers in a G-Zero World . New York: Portfolio/Penguin, ISBN 978-0670921041, 229 pp., £ 14.99.

Ian Bremmer (2012). Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers in a G-Zero World . New York:... The G20 doesn’t work, the G7 is history, the G3 is a pipe dream, and the G2 will have to wait. Welcome to the G-Zero [p. 35]. Sounding like the opening line of Hollywood’s next epic drama, this sentence captures the core argument of Ian Bremmer’s newly published volume. The author, president of the political risk research and consulting firm Eurasia Group , argues that transnational challenges such as climate change, economic instability and food security strengthen the need for international cooperation, but that no alliance or country is capable of taking the lead on these issues. Exploring the question of global leadership, he provides the reader with a thought-provoking discussion of how the world ended up in this global power vacuum and what the future may look like. Bremmer builds his argument upon an extensive overview of the challenges facing various international players, notably the G20 and great powers, both old and new. He admits a certain affection for the G20, but he does not hesitate to call it an aspiration rather than an organization. Questioning its efficiency in global governance, he compares the setting with ‘an enormous poker table where each player guards his stack of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Hague Journal of Diplomacy Brill

Ian Bremmer (2012). Every Nation for Itself: Winners and Losers in a G-Zero World . New York: Portfolio/Penguin, ISBN 978-0670921041, 229 pp., £ 14.99.

The Hague Journal of Diplomacy , Volume 8 (3-4): 343 – Jan 1, 2013

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
1871-1901
eISSN
1871-191X
DOI
10.1163/1871191X-12341262
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The G20 doesn’t work, the G7 is history, the G3 is a pipe dream, and the G2 will have to wait. Welcome to the G-Zero [p. 35]. Sounding like the opening line of Hollywood’s next epic drama, this sentence captures the core argument of Ian Bremmer’s newly published volume. The author, president of the political risk research and consulting firm Eurasia Group , argues that transnational challenges such as climate change, economic instability and food security strengthen the need for international cooperation, but that no alliance or country is capable of taking the lead on these issues. Exploring the question of global leadership, he provides the reader with a thought-provoking discussion of how the world ended up in this global power vacuum and what the future may look like. Bremmer builds his argument upon an extensive overview of the challenges facing various international players, notably the G20 and great powers, both old and new. He admits a certain affection for the G20, but he does not hesitate to call it an aspiration rather than an organization. Questioning its efficiency in global governance, he compares the setting with ‘an enormous poker table where each player guards his stack of

Journal

The Hague Journal of DiplomacyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2013

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