I S the Possible Doing Justice to God?

I S the Possible Doing Justice to God? I S THE POSSIBLE DOING JUSTICE TO GOD? by DOMINIQUE JANICAUD Actus justitiæ est reddere debitum. Sed Deus nulli est debitor. Ergo Deo non competit justitia. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica , I., ques. 21, art. 1 I would have prefered not to speak of God. I don’t deny the possi- bility of speaking to God; the great Judeo-Christian tradition has done it and still does. But speaking of God is particularly risky in philoso- phy, by using ideas, concepts, and categories which might turn out to be irrelevant to God (or not worthy of Him). I hope He will forgive me nevertheless, to speak of Him in this chapter, taking into account the fact that this is a reply to a friend of mine whom I like and sincerely admire. Long before Heidegger asked, “How does the deity enter into philosophy?” 1 Pascal opposed the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob to the God of philosophers. In the wake of these great forerunners, Richard Kearney in The God Who May Be suggests thinking of God not as an actuality, but rather as a possibil- ity, and to initiate a hermeneutical-poetical approach to the divine, rather than to seek http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

I S the Possible Doing Justice to God?

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
D.O.I.
10.1163/1569164042404464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I S THE POSSIBLE DOING JUSTICE TO GOD? by DOMINIQUE JANICAUD Actus justitiæ est reddere debitum. Sed Deus nulli est debitor. Ergo Deo non competit justitia. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica , I., ques. 21, art. 1 I would have prefered not to speak of God. I don’t deny the possi- bility of speaking to God; the great Judeo-Christian tradition has done it and still does. But speaking of God is particularly risky in philoso- phy, by using ideas, concepts, and categories which might turn out to be irrelevant to God (or not worthy of Him). I hope He will forgive me nevertheless, to speak of Him in this chapter, taking into account the fact that this is a reply to a friend of mine whom I like and sincerely admire. Long before Heidegger asked, “How does the deity enter into philosophy?” 1 Pascal opposed the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob to the God of philosophers. In the wake of these great forerunners, Richard Kearney in The God Who May Be suggests thinking of God not as an actuality, but rather as a possibil- ity, and to initiate a hermeneutical-poetical approach to the divine, rather than to seek

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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