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Hybrid Governance: The Case of Georgia

Hybrid Governance: The Case of Georgia Global Governance 19 (2013), 443–461 Hybrid Governance: The Case of Georgia Roger Mac Ginty Based on fieldwork interviews, this article examines the internationally sponsored good governance reforms in Georgia in the wake of the 2003 Rose Revolution. In one reading, the consolidation of power around the president can be seen as a failure of the good governance agenda. The ar- ticle argues, however, that rather than using the success/failure binary to judge Georgia, it can be seen as a hybrid political order. Using an adapted four-part model of hybridization, the article examines the complex mix of international, local, and transnational dynamics that combine to produce hybrid governance. KEYWORDS: governance, Georgia, corruption, hybridity. A BRIEF SURVEY OF STATES THAT HAVE EXPERIENCED POSTAUTHORITARIAN AND postconflict international interventions shows that many lag in indicators on democratization and transparency. This is despite substantial and sustained international peace support, transition, and governance interventions. The 2012 Freedom House indicators list Afghanistan, Cambodia, Côte d’Ivoire, Iraq, Rwanda, South Sudan, and Tajikistan—all states that have received sub- stantial international assistance—as being “Not Free.” All six states in which the UN Peacebuilding Commission has been active (Burundi, Central African Republic, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, and Sierra Leone) are ranked http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01903006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 19 (2013), 443–461 Hybrid Governance: The Case of Georgia Roger Mac Ginty Based on fieldwork interviews, this article examines the internationally sponsored good governance reforms in Georgia in the wake of the 2003 Rose Revolution. In one reading, the consolidation of power around the president can be seen as a failure of the good governance agenda. The ar- ticle argues, however, that rather than using the success/failure binary to judge Georgia, it can be seen as a hybrid political order. Using an adapted four-part model of hybridization, the article examines the complex mix of international, local, and transnational dynamics that combine to produce hybrid governance. KEYWORDS: governance, Georgia, corruption, hybridity. A BRIEF SURVEY OF STATES THAT HAVE EXPERIENCED POSTAUTHORITARIAN AND postconflict international interventions shows that many lag in indicators on democratization and transparency. This is despite substantial and sustained international peace support, transition, and governance interventions. The 2012 Freedom House indicators list Afghanistan, Cambodia, Côte d’Ivoire, Iraq, Rwanda, South Sudan, and Tajikistan—all states that have received sub- stantial international assistance—as being “Not Free.” All six states in which the UN Peacebuilding Commission has been active (Burundi, Central African Republic, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, and Sierra Leone) are ranked

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2013

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