Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Husserl's Relation to Hume

Husserl's Relation to Hume Husserl's Relation to Hume RICHARD T. MURPHY Boston College Edmund Husserl was convinced that philosophy could attain its re- quisite status of an absolutely rigorous science only if it adopted the phenomenological method of intentional analysis. For him the history of Western philosophy represented a series of abortive attempts to achieve this ideal of rigorous science. Still, progress had been made in the effort to break through to the only possible ground of a rigorously scientific philosophy, the intentional constitution of objectivity in sub- jectivity. Since the Cartesian turn to the "Cogito" marked for him the crucial stage in this progress, Husserl focused on modern European philosophy. Much has been written of Husserl's relationship to Descartes, Kant, and the neo-Kantians. His connections with the British Empiricism of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume have not been explored closely. This study examines the explicit references to Hume in key texts taken from Husserl's published works to ascertain in some measure the historical relation of Husserl to Hume. Among the British empiricists Hume gain- ed from Husserl the more extensive and favorable treatment. Indeed, in reply to Gaston Berger's query Husserl stated that Descartes and Hume had the most influence in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Husserl's Relation to Hume

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 9 (1): 198 – Jan 1, 1979

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/husserl-s-relation-to-hume-XyOC0hpwnw
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1979 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916479X00129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Husserl's Relation to Hume RICHARD T. MURPHY Boston College Edmund Husserl was convinced that philosophy could attain its re- quisite status of an absolutely rigorous science only if it adopted the phenomenological method of intentional analysis. For him the history of Western philosophy represented a series of abortive attempts to achieve this ideal of rigorous science. Still, progress had been made in the effort to break through to the only possible ground of a rigorously scientific philosophy, the intentional constitution of objectivity in sub- jectivity. Since the Cartesian turn to the "Cogito" marked for him the crucial stage in this progress, Husserl focused on modern European philosophy. Much has been written of Husserl's relationship to Descartes, Kant, and the neo-Kantians. His connections with the British Empiricism of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume have not been explored closely. This study examines the explicit references to Hume in key texts taken from Husserl's published works to ascertain in some measure the historical relation of Husserl to Hume. Among the British empiricists Hume gain- ed from Husserl the more extensive and favorable treatment. Indeed, in reply to Gaston Berger's query Husserl stated that Descartes and Hume had the most influence in the

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1979

There are no references for this article.