Husserl's Neo-Cartesianism

Husserl's Neo-Cartesianism 141 Husserl's Neo-Cartesianism W. SOFFER SUNY, College at Geneseo In Cartesian Meditations Husserl describes the relation between transcendental phenomenology and Cartesianism as follows: one might almost call transcendental phenomenology a neo- Cartesianism, even though it is obliged-and precisely by its radical development of Cartesian motifs-to reject nearly all the well-known doctrinal content of the Cartesian philosophy.1 The radicalizations constituting the Cartesian way to phenomenology which I shall discuss involve the replacement of Cartesian doubt by phenomenological epoche since the problem of the world is a clarification of sense rather than a criterion for existence, and the replacement of the Cartesian empirical ego by the transcendental ego to escape the circle involved in grounding the sense of mundaneity upon a likewise mundane existent2 In this way Husserl can call transcendental phenomenology a neo-Cartesianism. Commentators have been divided concerning Husserl's appraisal. Ricoeur argues that since Husserl does not recognize the essential grounding polarity of the cogito and god in Descartes' philosophy he produces a non-Cartesian rather than a radicalized Cartesian philosophy.3 3 Thdvanez claims that the Husserlian transcendental reduction and Cartesian doubt are radically opposed due to Husserl's failure to see the metaphysical thrust of Descartes' procedure. Husserl is wrong http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Husserl's Neo-Cartesianism

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/husserl-s-neo-cartesianism-REfsIlluy3
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1981 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916481X00081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

141 Husserl's Neo-Cartesianism W. SOFFER SUNY, College at Geneseo In Cartesian Meditations Husserl describes the relation between transcendental phenomenology and Cartesianism as follows: one might almost call transcendental phenomenology a neo- Cartesianism, even though it is obliged-and precisely by its radical development of Cartesian motifs-to reject nearly all the well-known doctrinal content of the Cartesian philosophy.1 The radicalizations constituting the Cartesian way to phenomenology which I shall discuss involve the replacement of Cartesian doubt by phenomenological epoche since the problem of the world is a clarification of sense rather than a criterion for existence, and the replacement of the Cartesian empirical ego by the transcendental ego to escape the circle involved in grounding the sense of mundaneity upon a likewise mundane existent2 In this way Husserl can call transcendental phenomenology a neo-Cartesianism. Commentators have been divided concerning Husserl's appraisal. Ricoeur argues that since Husserl does not recognize the essential grounding polarity of the cogito and god in Descartes' philosophy he produces a non-Cartesian rather than a radicalized Cartesian philosophy.3 3 Thdvanez claims that the Husserlian transcendental reduction and Cartesian doubt are radically opposed due to Husserl's failure to see the metaphysical thrust of Descartes' procedure. Husserl is wrong

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1981

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off