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Husserl and the Inner Structure of Feeling-Acts

Husserl and the Inner Structure of Feeling-Acts 84 Husserl and the Inner Structure of Feeling-Acts QUENTIN SMITH Boston College Edmund Husserl's theory of feeling has been one of the least known and yet one of the most innovative aspects of his philosophy. Its relative unknownness can be explained by the fact that an extremely small por- tion of his published writings have been concerned with feelings.1 But with- in these fragmentary analyses there can be found a number of new and im- portant distinctions that Husserl made in the nature of feeling. Instead of adopting the traditional tendency of simply describing the different "ob- jects" and "causes" of feeling, Husserl made as his theme the inner struc- ture of feelings themselves. He was thereby able to discover the descriptive differences between feeling-acts and feeling-sensations, and between feel- ing-emotions and feeling-tonalities. He was also able to bring to a new de- gree of clarity the substantial difference between feeling objects and the underlying "objects" that the feeling objects are founded upon. In this paper we would like to elucidate these and other distinctions that Husserl made, and to develop or modify some of his conclusions that we believe are in need of further analysis. To this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Husserl and the Inner Structure of Feeling-Acts

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 6 (1): 84 – Jan 1, 1976

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1976 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916476X00050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

84 Husserl and the Inner Structure of Feeling-Acts QUENTIN SMITH Boston College Edmund Husserl's theory of feeling has been one of the least known and yet one of the most innovative aspects of his philosophy. Its relative unknownness can be explained by the fact that an extremely small por- tion of his published writings have been concerned with feelings.1 But with- in these fragmentary analyses there can be found a number of new and im- portant distinctions that Husserl made in the nature of feeling. Instead of adopting the traditional tendency of simply describing the different "ob- jects" and "causes" of feeling, Husserl made as his theme the inner struc- ture of feelings themselves. He was thereby able to discover the descriptive differences between feeling-acts and feeling-sensations, and between feel- ing-emotions and feeling-tonalities. He was also able to bring to a new de- gree of clarity the substantial difference between feeling objects and the underlying "objects" that the feeling objects are founded upon. In this paper we would like to elucidate these and other distinctions that Husserl made, and to develop or modify some of his conclusions that we believe are in need of further analysis. To this

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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