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Hungarian Witnesses of Infrastructure Construction in Manchuria (1877–1931)

Hungarian Witnesses of Infrastructure Construction in Manchuria (1877–1931) This paper presents accounts of seven travelogues, written by Hungarian travellers and professionals who visited or worked in Manchuria between the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. So far these texts have not received wide scholarly attention because they are accessible only in Hungarian, although they contain unique first-hand observations of the construction of the Eastern Chinese Railway and many ethnographic notes. The author suggests that some narratives, especially those written by Hungarians who worked as engineering specialists, present very balanced analysis of the situation, because they belonged neither to the colonising project in China, nor to the colonised side, but rather were enthusiasts of technological modernisation. As a theoretical frame, the author attempts to apply notions and concepts developed by infrastructural and cybernetic anthropology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

Hungarian Witnesses of Infrastructure Construction in Manchuria (1877–1931)

Inner Asia , Volume 16 (1): 152 – Aug 19, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/22105018-12340008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper presents accounts of seven travelogues, written by Hungarian travellers and professionals who visited or worked in Manchuria between the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. So far these texts have not received wide scholarly attention because they are accessible only in Hungarian, although they contain unique first-hand observations of the construction of the Eastern Chinese Railway and many ethnographic notes. The author suggests that some narratives, especially those written by Hungarians who worked as engineering specialists, present very balanced analysis of the situation, because they belonged neither to the colonising project in China, nor to the colonised side, but rather were enthusiasts of technological modernisation. As a theoretical frame, the author attempts to apply notions and concepts developed by infrastructural and cybernetic anthropology.

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2014

Keywords: Hungarian travelogues; Manchuria; Eastern Chinese Railway; construction and breakdowns; infrastructural and cybernetic anthropology

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